LATEST ADDITIONS

John Atkinson  |  Jan 14, 2022  |  First Published: Jun 01, 1988  |  0 comments
So far, as part of my quest to find good affordable box loudspeakers, I have reviewed 20 models, in the August, October, and November 1987, and January and February 1988 issues of Stereophile (Vol.10 Nos.5, 7, & 8, Vol.11 Nos.1 & 2). Nearly all affordable loudspeakers have to be used with a pair of stands: as these have an important influence on the integrity of the sound and tend to cost upward of $100 a pair for good models, this makes such speakers less of a bargain. This month, therefore, I review loudspeakers designed from the outset to be floor-standing: three from the USA—DCM's Time Frame TF1000, the planar-magnetic Magnepan MG2.5/R, and the Orpheus 808—and one from Sweden, the Rauna Balder. The prices are pretty closely grouped, with the DCM being the least expensive, at a hair under $1100/pair.
Anthony H. Cordesman  |  Jan 13, 2022  |  First Published: Feb 01, 1986  |  2 comments
Memorandum:
To: Steve McCormack, Chief Designer, The Mod Squad

Dear Steve:

I cannot question the general value of Tiptoes in many specific applications. There are a great many areas where I, many other audiophiles, and a number of leading manufacturers have found that Tiptoes can improve any audio system in which the components are subject to. mechanical or acoustic vibration from speaker sound—that is, virtually any audio system.

J. Gordon Holt  |  Jan 12, 2022  |  First Published: May 01, 1984  |  6 comments
It would appear that there are still people out there who are unaware that this is the age of the transistor. Not only are tubed amplifiers not vanishing from the face of the earth, they are proliferating. Audio's equipment directory for 1977 listed three tubed power amplifiers. The same directory for 1984 lists over 30 of them, and the Quicksilver amplifier is not even included!
Michael Fremer  |  Jan 11, 2022  |  First Published: May 01, 2018  |  35 comments
Peter Ledermann, founder and chief designer of Soundsmith, Inc., began his adventures in phono cartridges by reverse-engineering Bang & Olufsen's Moving Micro-Cross moving-iron cartridges for customers B&O had abandoned when it got out of the LP player business, and putting them into production. The B&O cartridges were of the direct plug-in variety; once they were no longer made, a worn or broken B&O cartridge would render a B&O turntable unusable.
Kurt Gottschalk, Jason Victor Serinus, Stephen Francis Vasta  |  Jan 07, 2022  |  0 comments
Sol & Pat, J.S. Bach: Three or One, Britten, Young Apollo; Milhaud, Le Carnaval d'aix; Finzi, Eclogue*; Richard Strauss, Le bourgeois gentilhomme: Suite, Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande: Suite (arr. Nott); Schoenberg: Pelleas und Melisande and Fanny Mendelssohn, String Quartet; Felix Mendelssohn, String Quartets 2, 6.
Thomas Conrad, Fred Kaplan  |  Jan 07, 2022  |  2 comments
Joe Farnsworth: City of Sounds, Julian Lage: Squint and Enrico Rava: Edizione Speciale.
Phil Brett, Tom Fine  |  Jan 07, 2022  |  0 comments
The Replacements: Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trash (Deluxe Edition) and The Specials: Protest Songs 1924-2012.
Jim Austin  |  Jan 06, 2022  |  6 comments
Jay Jay French has a book out, but it's not what you might think, or not exactly.

French earned fame in the 1980s as the lead guitarist for transvestite metal band Twisted Sister, which produced some of the most recognizable—and widely licensed—rock music in history: "We're Not Gonna Take It." "I Wanna Rock."

Julie Mullins  |  Jan 05, 2022  |  14 comments
You may have heard that many hi-fi companies—manufacturers, distributors, and dealers—have done very well during the pandemic years. Some reported their best years in business—ever. With COVID-19 forcing people to stay at home, people sought diversion through home entertainment, including music. The industry benefited.
Tony Scherman  |  Jan 04, 2022  |  4 comments
Back in the mid-1960s, I was the unusual white, suburban preteen who, for reasons I've long pondered and never fully understood, was drawn much less powerfully to the Beatles than to blues and R&B. I was a bit of a jazz snob, too. Given these leanings, it's no surprise that one of the half-dozen or so albums that fried my impressionable young brain was that seamless blend of blues, R&B, and jazz, Ray Charles at Newport.

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