Robert Baird

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Robert Baird  |  Sep 04, 2017  |  10 comments
Few rock bands have ever inspired such a sharp cleavage in fan opinion.
Robert Baird  |  Sep 01, 2017  |  0 comments
In football there's a saying to describe an unexpected outcome: "That why they play the games." The recorded music equivalent might be "That's why you have to listen to the records."
Robert Baird  |  Aug 31, 2017  |  3 comments
Long ago, I stopped associating Act II of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake with dancing. Now, every time I hear it, I immediately flash on broken battlements, a black cape, and Béla Lugosi's unmistakable Hungarian accent: "Listen to them—cheelllldreennn of dee night. What muuuusic they make!"

Then there were James Bernard's tense scores for the Hammer films—like Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966), starring Christopher Lee—that my parents somehow let me see in a theater when I was seven, as part of an afternoon of bargain monster movies that included all the sourballs and unbuttered popcorn you could wolf down. Scared to death, my life was forever changed.

Robert Baird  |  Aug 24, 2017  |  2 comments
It's the dates as a leader on ECM that remain the most well-recorded part of John Abercrombie's legacy. The players he filled his ECM records with is a long and distinguished list, but he and his final quartet of Marc Copland on piano, Drew Gress on double bass (far left and left above), and Joey Baron on drums (far right) seemed to have special energy when they played together.
Robert Baird  |  Aug 19, 2017  |  0 comments
A successful exercise in recording vastly different sounds.
Robert Baird  |  Aug 17, 2017  |  1 comments
DeJohnette, Grenadier, Medeski, Scofield: Hudson
John Scofield, electric guitar; Larry Grenadier, bass; John Medeski, keyboards; Jack DeJohnette, drums.
Motema CD-228 (CD). 2017. Hudson, prods.; Scott Petito, eng.; Beth Reineke, asst. eng. DDD TT: 69:92
Performance ****½
Sonics ****½

Sometimes, a successful recording is not about the material, the studio, the producer, or even the players involved. Sometimes, it's about a shared feeling that grows among the players and conjures a groove. Grooves can be hard to find, especially among accomplished players recording together for the first time who have styles, ideas, and egos of their own. But once achieved, this invisible bond, this feeling of being in sync, should sound easy—as if there's nothing to it. It's this sort of natural, authentic pace and feeling that makes Hudson, the first recording from the quartet of Jack DeJohnette, Larry Grenadier, John Medeski, and John Scofield, such a success.

Robert Baird  |  Aug 16, 2017  |  5 comments
Elvis Presley's best recordings, particularly when it comes to his vocals, are his first.
Robert Baird  |  Aug 08, 2017  |  0 comments
Lots of in-the-moment twists and turns and a general sense of going with what felt right.
Robert Baird  |  Jul 31, 2017  |  0 comments
Chuck Berry's Swan Song
Robert Baird  |  Jul 29, 2017  |  32 comments
This kerfuffle oughta sell a few more Welch/Rawlings records, though.

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