What a Difference a Wire Makes Page 2

Test Group 1
The first series of tests (figs.4–11) used the 1kHz toneburst signal. In each graph, one of the two traces can be seen to be almost flat. This is always the more tightly controlled response, measured at the amplifier output terminals. Deviations here indicate deficiencies with the amplifier's negative feedback control. The other wilder, more wavy response is the imperfect damping measured at the speaker end. The different responses directly show each of the cables' ability to aid the action of the amplifier's NFB. The ranking (based on the distance between the first negative impulse and subsequent positive peak, in grid units and rounded to two significant figures) is:

Supra Ply: 0.7
Connectronics: 0.8
Sonic Link blue: 1.0
Sonic Link mains: 1.3
Twisted 1mm: 1.3
Monster Cable: 1.5
Zipcord: 1.5
Twisted 0.5mm solid: 3.6

In the above and all subsequent tables, the top of the list indicates best performance. Notice that even at this upper-midrange frequency, the damping-in-time varies. For example, the purpose-made top two cables have clearly damped to a low level after the first three half-cycles, whereas with some of the others, a distinct gap remains well after the third half-cycle. Also, the negative peak excursion is considerably smaller than the positive in some (zipcord and solid-core), whereas the difference between successive half-cycles of damping is less pronounced for the Connectronics and Supra Ply. As these two apparently present the smallest or shortest "damping demand" on the amplifier, the difference may be the NFB needing to act less. A curious feature, considering their physical differences, is the peaking similarity between the Monster Cable and zipcord.

620BD-FIG04

Fig.4 Zipcord at 1kHz.

620BD-FIG05

Fig.5 Connectronics at 1kHz.

620BD-FIG06

Fig.6 Monster Cable (LF section only) at 1kHz.

620BD-FIG07

Fig.7 Supra Ply at 1kHz.

620BD-FIG08

Fig.8 Twisted 1mm2 at 1kHz.

620BD-FIG09

Fig.9 Twisted 0.5mm2 at 1kHz.

620BD-FIG10

Fig.10 Sonic Link blue at 1kHz.

620BD-FIG11

Fig.11 Sonic Link mains at 1kHz.

Test Group 2
HF testing was carried out at 15kHz (figs.12–19). In all cases the signal shows a quite large but well-enough-damped ringing at the driven end. This is a common enough power-amplifier imperfection. Notice how much the peak amplitude of the larger of the two plots—which is always the signal at the speaker end—varies. Again, ranking is based on the difference in grid units between the first and second half-cycles. Surprisingly at such a high frequency, some of the fat, low-resistance cables are damping best—if not in the order one would predict from their CSA:

Supra Ply: 5.7
Sonic Link blue: 5.8
Connectronics: 5.8
Twisted 1mm: 6.0
Sonic Link mains: 6.1
Monster Cable: 6.2
Zipcord: 6.2
Twisted 0.5mm solid: 7.0

The ranking method is ad hoc. What happens if it's changed? The ranking below is the difference between the Send and Receive waveforms, with the cable having the least overall difference first. Again, the difference is in grid units:

Supra Ply: 1.0
Connectronics: 1.3
Sonic Link blue: 1.6
Sonic Link mains: 1.7
Zipcord: 1.8
Monster Cable: 2.0
Twisted 1mm 2.0
Twisted 0.5mm solid: 2.1

620BD-FIG12

Fig.12 Zipcord at 15kHz.

620BD-FIG13

Fig.13 Connectronics at 15kHz.

620BD-FIG14

Fig.14 Monster Cable (LF section only) at 15kHz.

620BD-FIG15

Fig.15 Supra Ply at 15kHz.

620BD-FIG16

Fig.16 Twisted 1mm2 at 15kHz.

620BD-FIG17

Fig.17 Twisted 0.5mm2 at 15kHz.

620BD-FIG18

Fig.18 Sonic Link blue at 15kHz.

620BD-FIG19

Fig.19 Sonic Link mains at 15kHz.

Test Group 3
Testing next at an upper-bass frequency, 125Hz (figs.20–27), the spread is similar and no less interesting. The best damped ranking, again based on the vertical grid units between the first two half-cycles, is:

Supra Ply: 0.4
Connectronics: 0.6
Sonic Link blue: 0.8
Sonic Link mains: 1.4
Twisted 1mm: 1.4
Monster Cable: 1.7
Zipcord: 1.8
Twisted 0.5mm solid: 4.8

Notice that at the point where the sinewave starts again, the destination signals in the zipcord and the 0.5mm solid-core cables have not wholly reconverged on the drive signal (look for the tiny gap), demonstrating not just poorer damping, but also excess dispersion or sluggish settling—this is likely to be different at other frequencies.

620BD-FIG20

Fig.20 Zipcord at 125Hz.

620BD-FIG21

Fig.21 Connectronics at 125Hz.

620BD-FIG22

Fig.22 Monster Cable (LF section only) at 125Hz.

620BD-FIG23

Fig.23 Supra Ply at 125Hz.

620BD-FIG24

Fig.24 Twisted 1mm2 at 125Hz.

620BD-FIG25

Fig.25 Twisted 0.5mm2 at 125Hz.

620BD-FIG26

Fig.26 Sonic Link blue at 125Hz.

620BD-FIG27

Fig.27 Sonic Link mains at 125Hz.

Controls
A natural follow-up question is: "How much are these results due to the cable's own characteristics, as opposed to the speakers'?" In figs.28 and 29, the worst- and best-performing cables were connected to an 8 ohm, 1kW–rated test load that is almost purely resistive. Now the differences are smaller, but still clearly discernible on this scale. So we may conclude that cables do exhibit measurable energy storage, but that a speaker's own energy storage usually swamps this.

Next, a control was run: The best-performing cable was reconnected the next day and replotted. Repeatability was very close. Small differences were due to the finite certainty of the Audio Precision's sampling and the display screen pixels, and to variations in contact resistance in both the XLR connections and the AP's relays.

620BD-FIG28

Fig.28 Twisted 0.5mm2 into an 8 ohm resistor.

620BD-FIG29

Fig.29 Supra Ply into an 8 ohm resistor.

Summary
For the first time, large differences have been demonstrated between different cables connecting a loudspeaker driven with a discontinuous signal (that represents a music transient) using industry-standard test equipment, and without recourse to exotic techniques. At 45mV relative to 1.3V RMS peak drive, alias –29dB down—or just 1 part in 28—the size of the largest measured perturbations is surprising. With the best-performing cables, perturbations are reduced to about 1/10 of this, or –50dB down. Hence the measurements show how cables expressly designed for audio, and in particular for speakers, can improve damping perturbations by at least 20dB.

Better cables also shorten settling time. The results clearly demonstrate the limitations (at least with a full-range speaker) of the conventional, simplistic approach of using the fattest wire, as well as the futility of using a thin solid core (footnote 6). The results also illustrate the logic of making special cables for AC power purposes—considering that mains current into any DC power supply is a burst waveform, much as is simulated here.

These tests make clear that Supra Ply is indeed a star performer, as claimed. Against a wider range of audio-grade cables, it would not be surprising if one or two of the other low-inductance types were strong competitors. But the point of this article is simply to show that cables do differ measurably in ways that relate to music. The measurements provide a way of short-listing serious contenders and eliminating spaced-eight cables from serious consideration, after which readers must make their own decisions based on cost and relative sonics in the context of their monitoring system(s).

Caveats
Even without advertising hype and misinformation, determining the "best" speaker cable for a given real-world situation is a complex issue. If your power amplifier turns into an RF oscillator because it can't handle high or even modest capacitance (and some otherwise reputable designs can easily fail under these conditions), you'd likely find the sonics better with a lesser (but less-capacitative) cable. If no one bothers to check for RF, using suitable equipment (at least a 35MHz 'scope), entirely wrong sonic decisions can be made. If RF occurs, then to use the low-inductance cable that speakers need, you should consider a) having the amplifier retired or sold; b) having the amplifier re-engineered for proper stability, using parts costing as little as $20; or c), less drastic than the first two options, moving the amplifier(s) next to (or much nearer to) the loudspeakers, so the cable capacitance (always a product of length) is slashed.

Another pitfall is with tube amplifiers, and transistor amplifiers with zero or low overall negative feedback. Their damping can be so poor (far worse than the situation seen in figs.12–19) that the cable's damping differences documented here may be swamped, again leading to a different optimum.

Acknowledgments
This article was made possible by the kind assistance of David Heaton of Audio Synthesis. Thanks also to Dr. Keith Holland at ISYR, Southampton University, UK; Patrik Lagerstedt; Mark Dodd; Matt Dobson; Richard Black; and Phillip Newell.


Footnote 6: Alvin Gold, "The Designer Series: Dennis Morecroft," Hi-Fi News & Record Review, August 1987.

COMMENTS
Anton's picture

I look forward to the day when my hobby catches up to 1995 and rediscovers the ability to measure such parameters in cabling to enable consumer comparison.

Imagine the conversations we could have! It would be like talking about cartridge compliance and tonearm mass, or speaker/amp impedence matching.

The places we could go!

Thank you one million for posting this, back to the future!

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Hi-Fi News measures cables :-) ......

Glotz's picture

I think Mr. Austin is trying to get some fights going... lol.

Anton's picture

For ‘our delectation’ means he wants to foment discord.

;-D

Jason Victor Serinus's picture

doesn't have to work very hard to get some fights going. Just breathing is enough.

Bogolu Haranath's picture

JVS could review the Crystal Cable Ultimate Dream pure silver interconnects ($20k) and speaker cables ($47k) :-) .........

Anton's picture

“The top of the line Nordost ‘loom’ now has a target on its back: the Crystal Cable ‘loom‘ May be the most revealing set of cables I have yet heard in my system. They capture ever finer levels of nuance and detail while still preserving startlingly quick shifts in dynamic tone and both the macro dynamic and micro dynamic ebb and flow of the program material. These cables are what ‘high end’ audio is all about and in the context of what they can achieve they are a worthy addition to a well heeled audiophile’s system. In the discussion of price, they may not be a bargain, but they certainly do offer value.”

There!

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Were you able to reach out and touch, Diana Krall, Norah Jones, Patricia Barber, Melody Gardot etc. etc.? :-) .........

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Did Louis Armstrong, Michael Jackson, Prince, James Brown, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra etc. etc. come alive in your listening room? :-) .........

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Did the walls and ceiling of your listening room disappear and you were transported to the symphony hall and the entire orchestra was playing right in front of you? :-) .......

mcduman's picture

none of those expressions aged well, did they?

i was reading a bike review the other day and the young reviewer said the 3000$ rims had an audiophile effect to them without even realizing that he was insulting us. questionable value for stupidly high prices is now the de-facto definition of audiophilism.

Bogolu Haranath's picture

One can buy a nice Giorgio Armani designer suit for $3,000 :-) .......

tonykaz's picture

Cable is undeniable. We've known it for Decades. Enid Lumley brought it to Audiophile attentions but the astute already began understanding the complex relationships of all circuits and connections materials and methodology.

Toyota Auto Company brilliantly triple seal their Automotive wire connections helping their cars have a 30 year useful lifespans ( very much to the embarrassment to Domestic Auto companies. )

Sensitive Instrumentation Manufacturers like Tektronix engineer Wire systems that assure accurate measurement of electronic circuit relationships.

Our Air Manufacturers like Boeing have engineers that specialise in Wire Designs to achieve consistant performance, cabling integrity is super-high Priority for them as evidenced in the 737 crisis that crippled the Company. ( a sensor issue )

Audiophile cabling's ownership problem is the Crazy Prices for useful Wire Designs.

Most every Audiophile would like to own a high performance Cable System, if only it could be within financial reach.

I'm hoping that a Brave Stereophile Reviewer ( like Mr.rschryer ) would step forward to assume the roll as our Wire authority and then provide readership with useful insights into this important element of audiophile bliss.

I'd calculate that most of the Cable Manufactures would be delighted to supply samples, useful knowledge and encouragement.

I certainly would be an anxious fan and reader.

Tony in Venice

ps. The Photo of instrumentation seems to include a 6 oz can of WD-40, I typically use Cramolin but will resort to WD-40 to help achieve a short term 'good electrical connection'.

Ortofan's picture

... HR has already volunteered his services for the role of "Wire Authority".
https://www.stereophile.com/content/gramophone-dreams-33-interconnects-loudspeaker-cables

Perhaps, RS would be willing to serve as 'Wire Authority in training'?

Bogolu Haranath's picture

I didn't know RS was training on 'high-wire' :-) .......

tonykaz's picture

Yeeeeeeeeessssss.... HR did sort-of promise some sort-of wire reporting. ( and Tube rolling, I think )

I'm holding out some Hope that Mr.RS could achieve real Status as: our Wire King of the Frozen North, an Authority, perhaps even a leading authority. I wonder if he feels like I'm dragging him into our crazy world of readership chaos and rough commentary resulting in endless pain and suffering? Lets hope not.

Wire is an exciting world of discovery, a tiny bit controversial and confrontational, it's like discovering the World is round in 1500s .

We need journalism explaining wire's many hidden secrets.

Tony in Venice

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Audiophiles are used to 'endless pain and suffering' :-) ........

tonykaz's picture

Red Book is the easy remedy to Audiophile agonies.

RedBook > Schiit > Active Genelec Pro-Audio Loudspeakers is a smooth pathway to Nirvana.

Let the healing begin. Vinyl is the 600 lb. Gorilla sitting in the middle of the Living room that defines Audiophiledom.

Tony in Venice

rschryer's picture

...that in my new position as Technical Editor of Stereophile I won't have the time to review cables. JA1 was canned from his duties yesterday for placing bets on the outcome of his workbench measurements, à la Pete Rose.

Now if I can just figure out what all those stupid lines on the screen mean...

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Those lines represent seismic activity for monitoring earthquakes :-) .......

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Fig.12 through Fig.19 represent EEG of somebody listening to Rap/Hip-Hop music :-) .......

tonykaz's picture

It won't be necessarily necessary, will it?

All those little numbers are holdovers from the Japanese Reciever Distortion Wars.

As long as Audiophiles have listening rooms with ambient noise levels in the 55 dba range it will be difficult to correlate measured performance/perceived performance and/or reviewed recommended performance.

Besides:

Measured performance triggers neurotic/psychotic episodes in existing owners and hesitant buying decisioning for prospective buyers.

Needs:

No.1) Value for Money measurement calculation should be one of the top indexes of Audio Gear. i.e. Schiit Ascgard2 for $250 should have a Value for Money rating of AAA+ since it's a Class A amplification and can drive most any headphone and is also a very nice Preamplifier.

No.2) Amplifiers and Loudspeakers should be properly rated for the Room Sizes they can fill. Audio Sound is simply pressure, amps and loudspeakers are pressure transducers. Can a room be properly pressurised?, or is the system a listening seat only ( bite bar as in those early Quad57s ). The clumsy reviewer attempt is to suggest Imaging abilities, which suggests the system has some sort of single listener narrowness as an important trait rather than a deficiency. A great music system is room filling like a Grand Piano.

No.3) If a 21st Century attempt at measurements is to be properly made, we need include the dopamine release data because the most important reason for enjoying music is the dopamine release. Little babies get the dancing thrill from casual hearing of music. Lets include the critically important Dopamine Index, please.

Bon Vivant

Tony in Venice

AJ's picture

Whoa Tony. Only if measured with maybe a Rat Shack meter or they live atop a sawmill ;-).
A broadband measurement would yield something quite different, especially in the ears most critical range.

Btw, did you know that the Hawksford nonsense cited above was completely debunked by jneutron (John E at Brookhaven National Labs)?

https://www.audioasylum.com/forums/prophead/messages//4367.html

Myths tend to be persistent...for those who believe.

cheers
AJ
Soundfield

tonykaz's picture

Are we discussing cylindrical waveguides ? I'm not.

I've owned sensitive Sound Pressure measuring instruments for my Automotive Industrial work. I've used those tools to measure listening rooms, acoustically treated rooms, semi-anechoic chambers and anechoic chambers, all of it real world stuff.

I'm trying to point out that everyday folks are living in high-noise environments.

Tony in Venice

AJ's picture

Nope. Strange you would ask.

55 dba 60 Hz ok, no prob, quite reasonable. 55 dba 2 kHz?? Whoa.
Kapish?

tonykaz's picture

I referred to your "Propeller Head Plaza" Article.

55 dba @ 60Hz. well, ok.

The rest of the ambient frequency range also contains levels including harmonics.

We would typically use Bruel & Kjaer sound and vibration measurement gear, full range Sweeps. I'm referring to gear who's cost is far beyond what any Audio Manufacturer or Sales outfit would ever own.

I happen to have had access to these research instruments because I was the Purchasing Agent that ordered them and I have an engineering background in Noise Vibration Harshness ( NVH ) workings. NVH is an important group of data in Automotive design and manufacturing.

From here on, I will not go into measurement practices or methodologies. I recognise that listening rooms all have sonic signatures that effect & affect audio gear performance envelopes.

Tony in Venice

AJ's picture

Ah, yes, that debunked the central theme of this article. Ok, two totally separate things, not room noise related.
The fact of the matter is, if I came to your room in Venice and measured, it would be rather extraordinary to see 55 dbA at 2 kHz.
And no we don't need auto industry gear. The same type of mic setup JA uses for speakers, or even a smart phone with calibrated mic would be sufficient.

cheers,

AJ
Soundfield

tonykaz's picture

I'm attempting to suggest the comparative significant relationship of detailed Measurements of Amplifiers to real world environments.

People's brains erase ambient sounds to the point of no longer noticing them, even when the ambient sounds are significant. Brains seem like powerful tools !

I appreciate the detailed measurements of our John Atkinson and Tyll Herston, they help to understand the usefulness of a device.

Yet, we audiophiles, ourselves, are sensitive measurement instrumentation with brains calibrated to normalize ( for lack of a better word ) our daily environments. We all hear and judge against our widely varying environments.

My realized difficulty is that the typical Citizen lives and enjoys MP3 & Bose Loudspeaker Quality levels, while I endlessly chase better sounding Audio Gear. I feel like an addict chasing a better high.

Tony in Venice

John Atkinson's picture
tonykaz wrote:
As long as Audiophiles have listening rooms with ambient noise levels in the 55 dba range it will be difficult to correlate measured performance/perceived performance and/or reviewed recommended performance.

You can find the spectrum of the background noise in my listening room at www.stereophile.com/content/john-atkinsons-listen-room-noise-level. Yes, my room is quiet.

John Atkinson
Technical Editor, Stereophile

tonykaz's picture

Thank you for the reveal.

My own rooms are similarly quiet and non-reflective.

I've always admired your curious analytical approach to understanding and explaining.

Tony in Venice

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Building 87, Washington state, USA ...... Microsoft building, is the quietest place on Earth ....... According to Guinness book of world records :-) ........

tonykaz's picture

These low levels can be useful for instrument measurement but I ( personally ) can't cope as the ambient level drops below 30ish dbA range. My brain reacts to sound, not the absence of sound.

For my purposes, I'm playing music with a realistic dynamic max range of 60db, hoping for a 100dbA peak playback level.

Naturally quiet listening rooms provide a pleasant atmospheric experience.

Tony in Venice

Bogolu Haranath's picture

In that building 87, probably SPL of 'Brownian motion' can be recorded :-) .......

tonykaz's picture

One of my Companys was named Esoteric Audio.

Brownian motion sound is way more esoteric that I can cope with.

Are air molecule collisions all that important to y'all???

Tony in Venice

ps. I need my ambient air molecules colliding properly, despite the sounds they make, they keep me from my long awaited dirt nap.

Bogolu Haranath's picture

May be 'Da'at' .... nap :-) .......

AJ's picture

...and non-reflective.

Ouch. Dedicated MCH I hope..

tonykaz's picture

what is MCH?

Tony in Venice

AJ's picture

Multi CHannel. The thing Kal Rubinson occasionally reviews.
And rarer JA
https://www.stereophile.com/content/wheres-real-magazine-we-see-it-february-2001

Wow, you are a stereophile ;-)

rschryer's picture

A stereophile is anyone who loves stereo.

Being a stereophile does not mean one can't also love other things, such as MCH or Mono.

I'm guessing you're a stereophile too, AJ. ;-)

AJ's picture

Well, my experience mirrors the reaction to the linked JA article.
Stereophiles abhor MCH, heretical. Movies, maybe, music no way. A quick peruse of any audiophile aka stereophile forum will confirm this.

Quote:

I'm guessing you're a stereophile too, AJ. ;-)

No sir. My pursuit is to make chicken salad of it.

cheers,
AJ
Soundfield

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Stereophiles have 2 ears ..... MCH people have 5.1 ears ....... People who listen to Dolby Atmos for example have 7.2.4 ears ...... That is the difference :-) .......

tonykaz's picture

I'm a 2 Channel owner, mostly because 2-Channel is the prevalent format.

I could easily be a MonoCH except there isn't any Mono any longer.

I love a room full of Sound.

Stereo seems like a fuller room full of sound than Mono.

Of all the things I'm doing, I'm not sitting down listening to a wide and clearly defined soundstage. Soundstage guys are far more obsessed than I could ever be.

I do enjoy a nice mood-altering piece of exciting music.

Tony in Venice

ps. MCH seems like it could be either/both Multi-channel and Mono-channel. Hmm.

ps.2). I wish my BBQ would have only one full burner instead of multiple burners.

AJ's picture
Quote:

I love a room full of Sound.

Stereo seems like a fuller room full of sound than Mono.

Of all the things I'm doing, I'm not sitting down listening to a wide and clearly defined soundstage. Soundstage guys are far more obsessed than I could ever be.

Then I find it even more difficult to reconcile your "non-reflective" room statement.
Ah well. Yes, your point about 2ch material being the most prevalent coincides with JA's article I linked previously.
That makes zero difference regarding channel count required for realism.

cheers,

AJ
Soundfield Audio

tonykaz's picture

you might be right.

I and my family discovered the improved quality of life from non reflective walls and surfaces. Everyday conversations are easier, book reading improves, etc... We've been working on this since 1980ish. Even the rare 'screaming' episodes are manageable without having to call the trigger happy 5 O people.

On realism, I'm not at all chasing it. I like wonderful sounds floating thru my residential Aether, it creates a pleasant anaesthetic environment. I keep adding ***** five Star music to my random playlist, I have thousands of these Songs that float along creating a 'mild' dopamine infused Incubator for fading-out Industrialists. Control for the dopamine level is the Volume knob. I'm like an Anaesthesiologist.

I should say that I began life with a singing mother that kept singing canaries, our little home was a wonderful sounds Odyssey.

Overall, I'm pretty much along the lines of Mr.Kalman Rubinson & Round 5.1 or 7.1 except that I'm happy with Mono or 2ch., I like the immersed feeling. I am particularly addicted to sitting in close to a live String Quartet as they electrify my nervous system like the most powerful & survivable forces in Nature. ( it's like being in the engine room of a working Tug-boat ; throbbing power )

Reading Stereophile is itself an Odyssey, all these interesting people going deep into the various facets of reproduced music gear and philosophies . ( Mr.Austin calls it a Big Tent ) It's like Gourmand Audio Journalism, an endless stream of beautiful offerings to sample.

Tony in Venice

ps. conspicuously missing are the "Reports from the Wilds" from Mr.Tyll. Mr.Herstens is one of the Greats in Audio Journalism, the World needs his insights .

Bogolu Haranath's picture

JA1's listening room has better SNR than some tube amps :-) .......

tonykaz's picture

which tube amps ?

Tony in Venice

Bogolu Haranath's picture

One example ...... Take a look at BorderPatrol tube amp ...... Fig.13, measurements ....... Also, Fig.12 :-) .......

Bogolu Haranath's picture

If a pin drops in the symphony hall where the recording is made, JA1 can hear it in his listening room :-) .......

Bogolu Haranath's picture

'Curious, analytical approach to understanding and explaining' ........ JA1 is like Sherlock Holmes ..... 'Elementary Dr. Watson' :-) ........

tonykaz's picture

I lived in England in the 1980s and can recall HFN&RR as the finest of all the Audio Journals in Print. So much so that I exported bundles of each issue to Sell on a Subscription basis ( I think for $27.50 ). I was then B &. K Imports and was selling subscriptions ( with the help of Laura Lovechio of Audio Mag. classifieds ) without any knowledge of HFN&RR, it's publisher and without any sort of proper/formal agreement. I just did it. I was a Grey Importer. I didn't realise or care that our JA was part of the publication. I only casually met Mr.JA at a 21st Century Audio Show, he didn't know me and was at that time quite busy with Show Related things. ( he did have the dam cleverest little A&K player that inspired me ).

Mr.JA's integrity gave our Hobby a legitimacy that seemed missing from most other Ad Content Publications. Even so, I miss the beautiful Adverts the Brits create, that HFN&RR had in Fold-Outs. ( i.e. Finding a Great High-Fi is like finding a Needle in a Haystack ).

Funny thing is that JA could've landed at Rolling Stone or any one of many technical Journals. Stereophile must've been a nice place to call home.

Tony in Venice

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Good thing, JA1 did not go into politics ..... Who knows JA1 could be the PM of UK :-) ......

John Atkinson's picture
tonykaz wrote:
Mr.JA's integrity gave our Hobby a legitimacy that seemed missing from most other Ad Content Publications. . .

Thank you, Tony. I learned my craft working with the late John Crabbe. See www.stereophile.com/asweseeit/communities/index.html. Money quote from that rememberance: "If you tell the truth about components you review, there will always be a small percentage of companies at any one time who are not advertising in your pages. But if you publish the truth, you will have a good magazine. And if you have a good magazine, you will have readers. And as long as you have readers, disgruntled advertisers will eventually return. But if you don't tell the truth, you won't have a good magazine. And if you don't have a good magazine, you won't have readers, at least not for long. And if you don't have readers, you won't have advertisers."

tonykaz wrote:
Funny thing is that JA could've landed at Rolling Stone or any one of many technical Journals. Stereophile must've been a nice place to call home.

Yes it was. Here's a link to the very first As We See It I wrote after arriving in New Mexico: www.stereophile.com/asweseeit/352/index.html.

John Atkinson
Editor, Hi-Fi News, 1982-1986
Editor, Stereophile, 1986-2019
Technical Editor, Stereophile, 2019 onward

tonykaz's picture

I wish that we all could have had useful mentoring, it would've changed everything in our world.

I'd like to work on any Elon Musk project, where would be the limits?, not even the sky!

Tony in Venice

ps. we are in for one hell-of-an-"onward".

AJ's picture

Wow. Indeed.
Then again, it's probably not a humid 90+ outside...

John Atkinson's picture
rschryer wrote:
JA1 was canned from his duties yesterday for placing bets on the outcome of his workbench measurements, à la Pete Rose.

Well at least you didn't compare me with Bill Buckner!

John Atkinson
Technical Editor, Stereophile

Bogolu Haranath's picture

At least RS did not compare JA1 to John Gochnaur :-) ........

rschryer's picture

Wiki: "Along with holding the distinction of being the last major leaguer to commit ninety errors in a season, Gochnaur holds the record for most at bats without a home run by a player with a career batting average below .200."

Boy, he stunk.

Bogolu Haranath's picture

I think JA1 is more like Babe Ruth :-) .......

Jim Austin's picture

... that I've started taking audiophile-editor steroids. Watch out, JA1. Your record isn't safe! :-)

Jim Austin, Editor
Stereophile

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Hope JA1 did not put any 'Curse of the Bambino' on that editor's chair :-) .......

Jim Austin's picture

Go, Red Sox!

(Not actually a huge fan--just lived in New England for 20 years and so rooted for the Red Sox vs the Yankees. Still, that Buckner play gives me nightmares, even though it was long before I moved to New England. I'm more a Yankee-hater, actually, plus Atlanta Braves fan. I'm a southern boy.)

Jim Austin, Editor
Stereophile

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Braves are the oldest baseball team, started in 1871 ....... Braves great Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth's home run record ...... Elton John is part owner of Atlanta Braves :-) ........

Bogolu Haranath's picture

RS did not compare JA1 to William Lee Bergstrom, either :-) ........

tonykaz's picture

Buckner was a Super-Star that played in 4 Decades of Major League Baseball.

Tony in Venice

John Atkinson's picture
tonykaz wrote:
Buckner was a Super-Star that played in 4 Decades of Major League Baseball.

Yes indeed, though with increasing health issues. I just can't forget the Mets' Mookie Wilson hitting the game-winning ball through Red Sox first baseman Buckner's legs in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpyJjecJnuI

John Atkinson
Technical Editor, Stereophile

tonykaz's picture

Phew.

Mookie seemed to be a "Hot" bat, electrically-alert team-catalyst.

Poor Buckner looked "outa-gas", just like I sometimes feel.

Baseball has its unforgettable and relivabe moments for those of us willing to let go of our problems, to be fascinated with spectacle.

The YouTube video is well worth watching, thanks.

Tony in Venice lock down ( again )

maelob's picture

100$ a meter! lol how about now 10k or 20k or even 50k a meter - I wonder how much better they sound

AJ's picture

...unless you have some sciency looking measurements ;-)

navr's picture

Only random controlled blind testing involving 100s or 1000s of participants can bring all this to a conclusion. When lives are at stake, RCT pharma trials through Phase 1, 2, and 3 are mandatory by law. With high end audio what is at stake are 1000s, 10s of 1000s, even 100s of 1000s of dollars. $22,000 speaker cable? 96% speed of light? Ok, let's conduct a RCT trial, fully in line with the science of statistics. If Big Pharma is forced to do it so should Big Audio. Big Audio is the best kept secret in the history of commerce and economy. Not under anyone's radar. Huge, huge profits, second to none. If you want to earn big bucks unaffected by macro-economic situation, go into audio cable business and make sure the name you give to your cable is magnificent. Palpable Nirvana comes to mind.
Pharmacology is about effects of medications on human body. There is no formula, no equation, that can compute this effect, for a simple reason: human physiology and medication interaction is a complex system. Only RCT can increase our knowledge and here is why. While it is true that an individual can be suspicious or in favor of anything out there apriori and even consider everything to be an illusion, there is a discipline called epistemology. In epistemology, one always starts with a belief, knowledge, and the concept of justification. Is justification that what makes belief a knowledge? Well, no. Because one can have justified true beliefs that are not knowledge. Bertrand Russel mentioned a case of a man who just entered a room with full expectation that the wall clock in that room was accurate. It just happened that this event took place at noon and that that wall clock, which was stopped, was showing 12pm i.e. noon.
Therefore, this man had a justified true belief on the basis of this wall clock, but at the same time, he did not have the knowledge since the clock was stopped. What, then, is the definition of justification?
In a broader sense, justification for believing in something is about having a foundation in support of the thesis, which can be obtained through memory, perception, and reasoning. Justified beliefs are not knowledge. We need to include perception in order to obtain knowledge on this complex subject. We need RCT blind testing of audio cables.

X