A Spectral Event at Innovative Audio in NYC

On Thursday, November 14, from 5–9pm, the Innovative Audio Video Showrooms at 150 E. 58th St, NYC, will host Richard Fryer, the Founder and President of Spectral Audio, to celebrate their more than 40 years of producing state-of-the-art music components with the East Coast debut of the DMA-300SV Reference Standard Stereo Amplifier. We will be playing the complete Spectral SV system, including the DMC-30SV Reference Preamplifier and SDR-4000SV Reference CD Processor.

Visit the Innovative Audio website for more information. RSVP (required) by email or by calling 212-634-4444.

COMMENTS
JRT's picture

I have not yet seen US pricing, but a web search turned up the following on the website of a non-US vendor.

non-US_vendor_website wrote:

Manufacturer's Specifications for Spectral DMA-300 SV

Power Output (continuous)
- @ 8 ohms - 225 Watts RMS
- @ 4 ohms - 410 Watts RMS
- @ 2 ohms - 615 Watts RMS

Output Current
- 60 Amps peak per channel

Frequency Response
- ±1 dB, DC-1 MHz
- ±3 dB, DC-1.8 MHz

Distortion
- Static: Less than 0.015% from DC to 100 KHz, typically 0.009% @ 225 WRMS/8 ohms
- Dynamic: 8 Tone Cluster Test 20 KHz @ 500 Hz separation 0.01% 8 ohms 0.015% 4 ohms

Speed
- Rise Time: Less than 225 nanoseconds
- Setting: 28 microseconds to 0signal noise
- Slew Rate: 800 volts/microsecond

Noise
- Signal to Noise: 108dB ASA A
- Crosstalk: 102dB @ full power 8 ohms

Input
- Impedance: 10K ohms
- Sensitivity: 1.5 volts/nominal output

Power Supply
- Line Voltage: 100 volts, 120 volts, 230 volts (factory wired
- AC Voltage Range: ±10%
- Maximum Consumption: 1600 Watts
- Quiescent Consumption: 250 Watts
- Operating Temp: 0° to 50° Celsius range; 32° to 122° Fahrenheit

Dimensions
- 19" (48.22cm) W
- 7 1/4" (18.4cm) H
- 18" (45.8cm) D

Weight
- 70 lbs, (29 KG) Net

non-US_vendor_website wrote:

Manufacturer's Specifications for Spectral DMA-400 SV

Power Output (continuous)
- @ 8 ohms - 350 Watts RMS
- @ 4 ohms - 580 Watts RMS
- @ 2 ohms - 750 Watts RMS

Output Current
- 90 Amps peak

Frequency Response
- ±0.1 dB, DC-100 KHz
- ±1 dB, DC-1 MHz
- ±3 dB, DC-1.8 MHz

Distortion
Static:
- Less than 0.015% from DC to 100 KHz.
- Typically 0.009% @ 350 Watts RMS / 8 ohms

Dynamic:
- 8 Tone Cluster Test 20 KHz @ 500 Hz separation
- 0.01% 8 ohms
- 0.015% / 4 ohms

Speed
- Rise Time: Less than 225 nanoseconds
- Settling: 28 microseconds to 0 signal noise
- Slew Rate: 1200 volts/microsecond

Noise
- Signal to Noise: 108dB ASA A

Input
- Impedance: 10K
- Sensitivity: 1.5V nominal output

Power Supply
- Line Voltage: 100 volts, 120 volts, 220 volts (internal wiring/factory)
- AC Voltage Range: +/- 10%
- Maximum Consumption: 2000 watts
- Quiescent Consumption: 115 watts
- Operating Temp. : 0° to 50° Celsius range; 32° to 122° Farenheit

Protection Features
- DC Protection Servo: 0.5V range
- Current Limit Onset: 90 amps
- Thermal Threshold: Protects at 85° Celsius, 185° Farenheit
- AC Main Fuse: 5A/3 AG slo-blo

Mechanical Specifications
- Dimensions: 20" (50.8 cm), W x 7 1/4" (18.4cm) H x 19.6" (49.9 cm) D
- Weight: 74 lbs (35.0) kg net

Bogolu Haranath's picture

Time for Stereophile to review one of the new Spectral power amps :-) .......

volvic's picture

Haven't heard a Spectral product since the mid 90's, when I heard their CD player and being blown away as to how good it was. Similarly during that time a well known Hi-Fi magazine editor told me that the folks from Linn, fresh from launching the Karik/Numerik, came over to his den to hear the Spectral and were left silent with what they heard coming out of that machine. If i had the moolah, Spectral would be on the top of my list. Pity this week at work is so busy and will not be able to attend.

dial's picture

Some of their old amps uses parts no more in production, so as for Goldmund and Swiss Physics, impossible to repair.

JRT's picture

High performance audio equipment is a relatively small market. A lot of the better solid state devices used in high performance audio equipment in mid/late 20th century were devices manufactured primarily for other much higher volume applications such as CRT televisions. When the primary application went away, so went away the production of many of the high performance devices used in those.

If you want something that will last a very long time, then consider buying a fossil, or maybe a pet rock, but not soldered electrical devices running with overly hot junction temperatures, using electrolytic capacitors (a leak waiting to happen), etc.

volvic's picture

Well that is a bit of a turnoff isn't it? You pay a king's ransom for this stuff and can't get it repaired twenty years down the road? I think Burmester might be the only company that I know of that keeps replacement parts for all their products, no matter how old.

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