Tony Scherman

Tony Scherman  |  Dec 06, 2022  |  3 comments
Summer 1959. The concert under the stars in the Wellfleet, Massachusetts, town parking lot was over. Pete Seeger was packing up his banjo as I approached him gingerly—I was 6 years old. I stuck out the notepad I'd been careful to bring. "Can I have your autograph?"

Towering over me, six-three to my three-eight, Seeger said in exasperation, if not outright coldness, "I don't give autographs. I'm not some goddamned star."

Terrified, I stood my ground.

Tony Scherman  |  Nov 30, 2022  |  1 comments
Tyler Chester was headed south on the I-5 to San Diego, where he would join indie-rock eminence Andrew Bird's road band for a brief tour. Touring is an activity Los Angeles–based Chester pursues with decreasing frequency, he told me in a recent phone chat. After years as a busy sideman and recording-session musician—he is equally proficient on bass, guitar, and keyboards—Chester finds himself spending less and less time as a player and more as a producer.
Phil Brett, Kurt Gottschalk, Tony Scherman  |  Nov 11, 2022  |  0 comments
Big Joanie: Back Home, Mike Cooper: Forbidden Delta Planet Blues, Dry Cleaning: Stumpwork and Bonny Light Horseman: Rolling Golden Holy.
Tony Scherman  |  Nov 09, 2022  |  0 comments
It was another glorious Lower Cape summer, the warm breeze almost viscous against your skin. Tim Dickey played bass, or ersatz bass, tuning his Gibson SG Special down an octave. I played drums. My brother John and cousin Dave Scherman traded leads. Tony Kahn was a good guitarist, but with the surfeit of guitarists, he played organ.
Kurt Gottschalk, Anne E. Johnson, Tony Scherman  |  Sep 09, 2022  |  0 comments
Madison Cunningham: Revealer, Black Midi: Hellfire and Porridge Radio: Waterslide, Diving Board, Ladder to the Sky.
Tony Scherman  |  Sep 01, 2022  |  3 comments
It would have been in the spring of 1967 that Tim Hardin's music first wafted in over my transom. I was 13. My older brother, who loved Hardin at least as much as I did and was something of a fetishist besides, forbade me to touch his copy of Hardin's debut album, Tim Hardin 1, not even the jacket. He had to be present when I auditioned it. Tim Hardin 2 didn't especially float my boat, so my brother had it to himself. But the moment I heard Tim Hardin 3 Live in Concert, I took matters into my own hands, so to speak, and plunked my own $5 down.
Larry Birnbaum, Anne E. Johnson, Tony Scherman  |  Jul 15, 2022  |  0 comments
Camp Cope: Running with the Hurricane, Oumou Sangaré: Timbuktu, Old Crow Medicine Show: Paint This Town and Spiritualized: Everything Was Beautiful.
Tony Scherman  |  Jun 07, 2022  |  7 comments
When an icon drops her first album in six years, you sit up and take notice. Bonnie Raitt made her earliest record a half-century and more ago, in August 1971. She was 21 and could easily have been carded; the face on the cover of Bonnie Raitt—that first album—has yet to shed all its baby fat.
Phil Brett, Anne E. Johnson, Tony Scherman  |  May 13, 2022  |  1 comments
Son House: Forever On My Mind, Superchunk: Wild Loneliness and Yard Act: The Overload.
Tony Scherman  |  Apr 27, 2022  |  2 comments
In the spring of 1969, as an aspiring jazz drummer of 15 pretentiously and largely uncomprehendingly drawn to the music's difficult avant-garde, I learned that Don Cherry, Ornette Coleman's alter ego during Ornette's starvation years and an icon of free jazz himself, had recently moved to the village of Congers in my native Rockland County, New York, just north of New York City. Ornette was putting together a group drawn mostly from his early cohorts, and the call went out to Stockholm, where Don had settled—to the extent that he settled anywhere—with his Swedish wife, Moki. Hence his arrival practically on my doorstep.

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