Sam Tellig

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Sam Tellig  |  Feb 22, 2001  |  0 comments
Sorry to empty your wallet this month, but here's a must-have if you want to get the most from your upsampling MSB Link DAC III: Monarchy Audio's Digital Interface Processor 24/96 (DIP for short).
Sam Tellig  |  Feb 06, 2001  |  0 comments
The year was 1948. As a six-year-old, I haunted record stores with my Uncle Stan. A quiet bank teller from Manchester, England, childless himself and quite overpowered by my Aunt Emily, Uncle Stan shared with me his love of music and movies.
Sam Tellig  |  Feb 06, 2000  |  0 comments
It's been three years since the February 1997 issue, when I last talked with Klaus Heymann, founder and chairman of HHN, the parent company of the Naxos and Marco Polo labels. When I heard that he'd be in New York for a visit, I jumped at the chance for another interview.
Sam Tellig  |  Jun 04, 1997  |  0 comments
At last—a CD player from a company that doesn't like CD.
Sam Tellig, Various  |  Nov 06, 1996  |  0 comments
"Musical Fidelity X-10D" it said on the box. No, this is not bathtub mildew remover or laundry detergent. Actually, it's hard to figure out exactly what it is. The box is little help. Musical Fidelity calls the X-10D "the missing link," a "pure Class A CD-player accessory."
Sam Tellig  |  Aug 27, 1995  |  First Published: Aug 27, 1994  |  0 comments
"Pssst, Sam. I've got this great speaker for you."
Robert Harley, Sam Tellig  |  Aug 08, 1995  |  First Published: Aug 08, 1985  |  0 comments
The $395 NAIT, rated at 20Wpc, is a good-sounding little amp. It's very open and spacious-sounding, but, like the $250 Rotel RA-820BX, sometimes sounds a little hard in the upper registers.
J. Gordon Holt, Sam Tellig  |  Aug 01, 1995  |  First Published: Aug 01, 1976  |  0 comments
This is something we don't see too often: an entirely new approach to power amplifier design. As Quad points out in its literature for the 405, class-A operation of transistors provides the lowest distortion, but drastically limits the amount of power an output transistor can deliver without overheating. (Most transistor amps use class-AB output operation, in which each of a pair of power transistors handles part of each signal cycle and shuts down during the other part. Imperfect synchronism between the two halves causes the familiar "crossover distortion," which accounts for most solid-state sound. In class-A operation, each output transistor draws current though the entirety of each signal cycle, eliminating the crossover transition but doubling the amount of time current is drawn, and thus tending to cause the transistor to heat up more.)
Sam Tellig, Various  |  Jun 30, 1995  |  First Published: Jun 30, 1994  |  0 comments
"You are not going to believe this."

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