Wes Phillips

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Wes Phillips  |  Oct 23, 2007  |  0 comments
The Royal Society has posted Robert Hooke's notes online. And yes, he apparently was just as cranky as Stephenson portrayed him in The Baroque Cycle.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 22, 2007  |  1 comments
Joe Queenan gives good rant.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 22, 2007  |  0 comments
Oscar Wilde's chief talent was appropriation, says Dr. Michèle Mendelssohn.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 19, 2007  |  0 comments
Huckleberry lurks in the shadows.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 19, 2007  |  1 comments
Now that it's fall, Bagheera barely leaves the toasty top of the Mac music server.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 18, 2007  |  0 comments
Taking a really close look at Leonardo's portrait.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 18, 2007  |  0 comments
At last, an explanation of why carefully coiled cables grow knots.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 18, 2007  |  0 comments
I read Slate primarily to catch my colleague Fred Kaplan's "War Stories" column, but whenever I read Fred, I also go to Garry Trudeau's "The Sandbox," a milblog that allows military personnel stationed in Iraq and Afganistan to "vent, rhapsodize, and [inform] the folks on the home front . . . what is going on from their point of view."
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 18, 2007  |  0 comments
Haven't heard of it yet? You will. It's an opportunistic pathogen that is extremely resistant to antibiotics—some people call it a super bacterium. Jon Carroll writes about it in his column today, which, like all of his columns, is a great read.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 17, 2007  |  0 comments
Philip K. Dick has become a huge success 25 years after his death. He'd have seen the humor in that.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 17, 2007  |  0 comments
This is your brain on advertising.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 16, 2007  |  1 comments
We might have neighbors—and they could be closer than we thought.
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 16, 2007  |  1 comments
John Marks sent along this Stochelo Rosenberg video, commenting, "Holy Schemoley."
Wes Phillips  |  Oct 16, 2007  |  0 comments
Sean O'Hagan asks, "where are the heirs to awkward buggers like Robert Wyatt?"

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