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linden518
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Left Field Discoveries

New game. I'm sure we encounter a lot of moments when we discover something great COMPLETELY inadvertently. List them here, not just music-related. The only rule of this game is not to reply with snide jackass comments, like "Oh, that ain't so great." We have enough threads for the Tourettic assholes of the world around here, so respect: this thread is just for sharing your moments.

I'll go first.

1. The Largo from Vivaldi's Double Concerto for Oboes, PV535.

I go to a church where members of NY Phil or Juilliard attend, and get to hear great performances regularly during service. Last Sunday, during Offertory, two oboists played the Largo from Vivaldi's Double Concerto, backed by a restrained organ accompaniment... and it was THE most moving musical experience I've had in the past 2-3 years, even surpassing Radu Lupu's Schubert recital at Carnegie, which I attended couple of nights before the birth of my 2nd daughter w/ my wife... I scavenged to find an LP of this around the city, but to no avail yet. In a single swoop, though, I've become addicted to Vivaldi, as I've been buying up various LPs. Yes, Vivaldi is great, aside from providing the soundtrack to the movie Wall Street.

2. "Giddy Up" by The Hives

The best, inadvertent hip-hop song of the past decade by a rock band. I crank it up in the car while my two girls bop heads in the back in their baby seats. G-yeah!

3. Schumann Duets by de Gaetani/Guinn/Kalish

Contains the best rendition of my favorite duet of all time, "In der Nacht" by Schumann, written during the last period of the composer's life when he had a brief spell of lucidity from mental illness. If you're curious, I blogged about it here:

http://selfdivider.com/base/?p=35

Anyway, the CD of Schumann Duets by de Gaetani/Guinn/Kalish is OOP and often sells for $100+ (there are a couple used copies on Amazon selling for $35 or so, the lowest I've seen in a while). You'd understand why when you listen to de Gaetani and Guinn singing "In der Nacht" and weep. Anyhoo, I totally stumbled into an ebay sale and picked up the vinyl of it for $3.50. The Nonesuch pressing is better than I expected, way better than the CD, and I've listened to the LP every night for the past week.

linden518
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

4. Ice Cream Sandwiches

I had no idea. Perfect for soggy summers.

Lamont Sanford
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

1. "Tourettic" assholes

I was thrilled with anticipation when I was looking that word up in the dictionary.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Had a party on Aug 16, to celebrate the death of Elvis.

On the invitation, included the first stanza from Milton's Lycidas.

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Lycidas

Yet once more, O ye Laurels, and once more
Ye Myrtles brown, with Ivy never-sear
I com to pluck your Berries harsh and crude,
And with forc'd fingers rude,
Shatter your leaves before the mellowing year.
Bitter constraint, and sad occasion dear,
Compels me to disturb your season due:
For Lycidas is dead, dead ere his prime
Young Lycidas, and hath not left his peer:
Who would not sing for Lycidas? he knew
Himself to sing, and build the lofty rhyme.
He must not flote upon his watry bear
Unwept, and welter to the parching wind,
Without the meed of som melodious tear.

Surprisingly moving. Wiped away my smirk about celebrities and mortality upon which the cheeky invite was based.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries


Quote:
1. "Tourettic" assholes

I was thrilled with anticipation when I was looking that word up in the dictionary.

You must have been like Cartman when he learned about Tourette Syndrome. That just might be the funniest episode of South Park evah!

Lamont Sanford
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Re: Left Field Discoveries


Quote:

Quote:
1. "Tourettic" assholes

I was thrilled with anticipation when I was looking that word up in the dictionary.

You must have been like Cartman when he learned about Tourette Syndrome. That just might be the funniest episode of South Park evah!

2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Petit_Tourette

The Plot sounds a lot like The Open Bar.

KBK
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

It's my job to exist and be as a person who constantly comes to new left field type discoveries. I wish I could share them! My personal record is 5 fully blown epiphanies in one day. That was a high one. Please, no comments. No drugs were involved. I wish I could say something. I can't even give hints.

linden518
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Oh, c'mon, KBK. Now you've built it up too much not to tell.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Lindt 85% Cocoa Chocolate. It ain't your grandmothers Chocolate.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries


Quote:
It's my job to exist and be as a person who constantly comes to new left field type discoveries. I wish I could share them! My personal record is 5 fully blown epiphanies in one day. That was a high one. Please, no comments. No drugs were involved. I wish I could say something. I can't even give hints.

Only five?

One of my highlights was when I was offered a spot in the Rapture but declined. I prefer to see things through. What's a few years of overtime?

------------------

Leaving my astral travel aside for now...

The movie Dead Man took me by surprise by how much I liked it.

Same with the book "Confederacy of Dunces."

I expected Baudolino to measure up, but was impressed by how much it made me wish it wouldn't end.

Back in the day, Unbearable Lightness of Being and The World According to Garp really came out of left field to take over my brain. They were both a quantum leap forward for the authors.

High Fidelity was also a nice shot out of the blue.

With movies, it's tough, because I go in hoping for a great flick, so knock down drag out left field amazement is rare.

Blade Runner and Apocalypse Now! both surpassed expectations. So did True Romance.

Musically, the DG release of Haydn 88 and 89 was a true revelation (in the 70's.)

1983 Caymus Special Select cab set itself apart from its compatriots in a new and exciting way.

My first sour apple and watermelon Jolly Ranchers positively swept me off my feet.

1981 Prager cab.

Dubliners.

Reno, an aimless girl, a geographic memory, was so great, she should be a song lyric.

First sushi was all that, too! Totally left field!
Sunset tonight was all that.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Taking kids to the doctor's office near a hospital several years back and finding a celebration going on with a carribean band with steel drums that sounded very good. Even walked up close to hear it play.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Grosse Pointe Blank was an unexpected terrific movie. I saw L.A. Confidential with very low expectations and was totally engrossed. I still watch it every now and again. But, the most unexpected blast I've had with concerts was seeing KC and the Sunshine Band about 10 years ago at (of all places) the rodeo.

Probably the most jaw dropping shock that I've ever experienced was my first Nascar race. My wife and I went to Talladega, Ala. some 15 years ago and I'll never forget the look on my wife's face when that train of cars came flying by at 200 mph, bumper-to-bumper. TV just can't capture that.

linden518
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

My new homie: Skip James.

Goldberg Variations on... marimba?? :

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/30/arts/music/30schw.html

KBK
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Re: Left Field Discoveries


Quote:
Grosse Pointe Blank was an unexpected terrific movie. I saw L.A. Confidential with very low expectations and was totally engrossed. I still watch it every now and again. But, the most unexpected blast I've had with concerts was seeing KC and the Sunshine Band about 10 years ago at (of all places) the rodeo.

Probably the most jaw dropping shock that I've ever experienced was my first Nascar race. My wife and I went to Talladega, Ala. some 15 years ago and I'll never forget the look on my wife's face when that train of cars came flying by at 200 mph, bumper-to-bumper. TV just can't capture that.

I was there at the last year they had Nascar(?)/Cart in downtown Detriot. We had to walk OVER the nascar track to get to the center area. The public could do so and do this during the race. The spacing was tight..and the cement barriers for the track were not all that far away.

Point being, is that even though the cars were only up into the 150mph area at this section..the closeness of the track, combined with the barriers and the elevated position created a shotgun barrel proximity effect and the slam of air and resultant negative pressure was quite ..er..invigorating for most folk.

I got a great long shot (straight down the line of the straightaway -from the front-with a big telephoto)of Al Jr. going sideways in a tight spot on a short straight between two other Cart cars. There was only room to hit it sideways ..and there he was..doing exactly that..with all 4 tires smoking.

linden518
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

The Bon Iver album totally hit me hard last night. Neither loved it or disliked it, didn't feel too strongly about it for all these months, until listening to it at 11 pm at work, through LA7000 headphones, the song "Re: Stacks." Threw me for a loss.

KBK
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

A few Left Field films for you folks:

The Quiet Earth.

Dark City.

And for those of you who are Sci-Fi fans (the above two are Sci-Fi), I present: 'The Hidden'.

That one stuck to my brain so hard I only had to see it the one time.

THX-1138

Scary-'real' stuff: Citizen X

Cat People

And many more I can't remember.

Oh yeah: Romeo Is Bleeding.

Boondock Saints.

Most of these films, for one reason or another will find you at the end, crawling around on the floor looking for missing bits of your brain, crying 'mommy, mommy'... A real baseball bat to the senses. My kinda films. If it don't fuck me up- I'm not interested. Sure, mindless fun is mindless fun, but I wanna be punched and dragged about by the films I watch so that I never feel the same again about reality afterward. Some titles are just fun, but they make you react powerfully - regardless. Like 'True Romance'. Like the first time you saw 'To Live and Die in LA'. This was the first time you saw Willem Dafoe, it was. You remember his performance and he was henceforth marked as a man whom you would very likely watch anything he was in- the performance was that powerful.

Lamont Sanford
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

I'll second Dark City, Romeo is Bleeding, Cat People (1982), and add Barton Fink.

KBK
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Oh, you like that one Lamont? (Romeo is Bleeding) Didn't that one make you want to go out and drive your head through a cement wall or something -or move a bit further away from the wife on the couch? Massive brain hurt on that one.

When Gary (Oldman) does that thing he does, you wonder, like Mel Gibson does it..where are you going to find that in you? What memories can you conjure to find such pain in yourself? Gary was still a hardcore Alkie at the time, so that does explain part if it. Like when he was playing with the set of hands in 'State of Grace', and freaking out Shaun Penn's character - He kept poking at him with the hands.

Romeo also has an awesome soundtrack, and it can be found on eBay. It is worth buying, just to bring back the memories, and most specifically the feel of the film. Besides being very good by itself.

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Quote:
and add Barton Fink.


As long as we're on Coen Bros., Millers Crossing is the most underrated gangster movie, ever.

KBK
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Where else can you see Albert Finney Under a bed with a Tommy Gun?

Speaking of Gabriel Byrne, The fully blown (3+ hours) 'finally makes perfect sense' version of Michael Mann's 'The Keep' (from the fantastic F. Paul Wilson novel) may eventually appear. It apparently was screened to an audience last year in London. I'da paid to see that. The film is hard to keep together and works best if you know the novel. For all of it's shortcomings and nonsensical points, there are some aspect of the film (the one currently in print) that are staggering.

Lamont Sanford
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Quote:

Quote:
and add Barton Fink.


As long as we're on Coen Bros., Millers Crossing is the most underrated gangster movie, ever.

Gotta love the Coen Brothers. I think they got another one coming out.

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This disc caught me out of the blue for fun and sound quality!

The cover of Voodoo Child just rules the room! Demo quality.

Movie-wise, trying to stay off the beaten path...

Choose Me

Chilly Scenes of Winter

Face in the Crowd

It's famous, but Pulp Fiction hit me out of the blue.

Breaking Away

____________________

Spring Break 1975, I was 15, and went with my dad to Santa Cruz. I was walking around downtown and strolled into Odyssey Records and heard Natty Dread for the first time. By the time the first words to "Lively Up Yourself" cued up, it was a transformative event for me.

I immediately ran away from home and worked there while living in an attic (no power, water, AC, etc) of a giant dilapidated yellow house and did scut work for the record shop from opening 'til midnight.

I had to let some cult baptize me in the ocean, but I got to stay in the giant house for free.

I saved up enough money to buy a Pioneer QC 800A and QM 800A preamp and amp and a long extension cord. Had a Pioneer PLA 45D turntable and Audio Technica something "needle" and a Pioneer CD-4 decoder, with four Magnum Opus two way speakers with a woofer in the top and the front baffle!

I still have all of them except the speakers, lost in a house fire - that was not my fault.

The cops found me in late August and I had to go back to my mom's house in Reno for the next school year.

It all happened specifically because of one LP record. (Which I also still have.)

I think that one record also had a significant lifelong impact on my philosophy. My accountant sure thinks it did - only she isn't all that positive about the effect.

Is that TMI?

Plus, how do I ever tell my sons this part of my life? A life determined by two twenty minute slices of Licorice Pie?

Post Script: When I got back to Reno, my friends actually asked me what was up with that "Reggie Music."

KBK
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Cool Stuff, Buddha. Much respect. My story has it's own similarities. Not fit for print, tho. Omelettes and eggs and all that stuff.
I suspect the line that might fit just a bit, is one that a elderly gentleman leveled at me just the other day, which is, "I guess you are obviously not the 'joiner' type". Ie, not a follower, not a joiner, not a quitter, or a leader, but an individual-with a working brain.

For if a doorway opened in front of me to a different dimension and someone or something (a view-whatever) at it's border beckoned me to come.. to go, go now..and I had seconds to decide, to never be seen again, to head to a new world -to new places... I'd be gone, without more than those seconds of hesitation. Adventure? At any price? Very likely. A hop and a skip -and it begins- afresh.

Just remember, they share your genes. Payback is a bitch.

linden518
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What a story, Buddha. Your sons will thank you for that story, but make sure you tell them AFTER their angst years.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries


Quote:
The Bon Iver album totally hit me hard last night. Neither loved it or disliked it, didn't feel too strongly about it for all these months, until listening to it at 11 pm at work, through LA7000 headphones, the song "Re: Stacks." Threw me for a loss.

I love that song.

Four bands/artists have been driving me crazy; I had tried to resist them all, until I just broke down:

Cold Cave
Blank Dogs
Zola Jesus
Gary War

They all sound like crap at first, and then the melodies suddenly come from nowhere and just kill.

KBK
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Two Left field films. Don't try to learn anything about them except what I print here.

Bellman & True

A late 80's British Gangster Heist Flick. part of what you see today in all those films, Heat, 'The Heist', any of that-very likely was influenced by this film. I'd say that Guy Richie was influenced by this film. Very human, very powerful. Walk in cold, don't read up on it anywhere-watch for the brain hammers. What I mean by that is it is just a bit on the sublime and basic side-but very skillfully crafted. They'll getch'ya good. Not overstated, done just right-just so. The film will be enjoyable, even the aftermath and memory.

"Look! It's just a simple Law of Physics! The hole is Too Fucking Small!!"

A standard kinda quote about this film: "But across all heist movies "Bellman and True" is my all-time favorite."

Good luck finding it.

Exorcist III

Re-done version of what the second film was supposed to be-by the author himself. He was so angry with what they did to his story he decided to reset the scene and make a film that makes as if the second, that vile piece of garbage-did not exist. Remember-this film is the follow up to the FIRST film-there is no second. Got it? The writer's vision was perfected-as the writer himself directed it. George C. Scott is in this throughout, and his performance is right up there with his work in 'Patton' and 'Dr. Strangelove', which is, in a word - magnificent.

What if? What If Hitchcock smoked some weed after doing Psycho, ruminated and went metaphysical on his own ass... and decided to do a true religiously oriented Horror flick?

That would be Exorcist III.

"I just knew you weren't really a radio repairman. That's a telephone I'm holding."

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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Buddha- Great story. I was already a gonzo hippie of 23 when Natty Dread broke- but I was initiated to Bob Marley by the most unlikely co-workers, who I misjudged as uncultured whitebread rubes who collected Scirocco wall sconces and wore wingtip shoes.

We went to the concert at the tiny Roxy theater on Sunset that year and it was the most singularly transcendent music experience of my life.

I brought a group of hard core metalheads to his concert at the Santa Monica Civic the next year and they were blown away.

IMO, the guitar solo on Concrete Jungle (Catch A Fire) is the most restrained, yet searing and emotional evocation of 3rd World struggle on record.

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Quote:

They all sound like crap at first, and then the melodies suddenly come from nowhere and just kill.

Exactly! Long after I've grown weary of the catchy hooks of the popular cuts on most albums, I return to the more obscure titles that flew under the radar. Which is why I prefer not to collect "best of" compilations- too much great music gets missed. You are wise beyond your years to recognize the hidden joys of challenging music.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Thanks for bringing up Exorcist III, it was good!

KBK
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

I've said this one before, but I've never heard back from anyone who says they've heard it:

Sheila Chandra:Nada Brahma (sound Is God)

I still member the day I heard it for the first time.

I still remember the day the Store owner and I wrestled over the last copy (LP).

If you are fan of 'anything goes' and enjoy things that might be a bit, er, transcendental, then nothing tops this album. The one song, 'Nada Brahma' says it all.

The store owner had 40,000 albums. This was near or at #1 on his list of 'best'. Most of his stuff was jazz and blues, but..it was also very flavor of music you can imagine.

it is the most sampled song in music history. The Dj's and the ambient/rave crew of music makers would try to put in their songs, somewhere-anywhere, as it always drove people wild. Seriously.

It really is 'the shit'. As heady as it gets. Off the scale, it makes it's own way. What else can I say to drive it home?

Hear this record.

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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Kerouac on the Road
William Burroughs Junkie
Neal Cassidy the First 3rd
Bukowski Ham on Rye

A million little pieces James frey

reading LOTR in 5th grade...blew my mind. made me feel very weird.

Hearing "Dichterliebe" for the first time(sung by Quasthoff, natch)

Hearing James Morris as Wotan in Die Walk

KBK
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Ex-Russian KGB assassin. She garroted her first lover/assignment to death during an orgasm, at age 13.

From Romeo is Bleeding:

Meet Mona Demarkov.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zw59a_-83f0&feature=related

You can watch this part without ruining the film.

*Warning, it's a bit...er...strong.*

As well, it is -by far- Mark Isham's finest soundtrack, IMO.

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Quote:
Ex-Russian KGB assassin.

thats a bit violent for someone that says we indulge in too much violence as a species, yes? didnt expect to see you championing such..

KBK
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Absolutely true. Do as I say, dammit! Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain...

It is a favorite from my past. As well, one of the problems is that old (or new) aspect of 'visuals' itself, ie --film. The monkey in us is not yet used to seeing things like that and understanding the difference between the lie and the truth. We have, on a subliminal, or unconscious level, a difficulty in differentiating. In the same way sequences from our childhood play over and over in our brains until we integrate them, or from lets say ...some of the episodes you may have encountered in that other place you personally visited, NC.

Film can have the same effect on the more 'unconscious' type of our brethren. That it does affect the awake and aware regardless, and that the effect is even more powerful on the more 'unconscious' or 'sleeping' of the public, that point is not lost on me, nor is it lost on those who work at designing and actually execute the idea of mass programming through the constant barrages of ..whatever.

Due to the near perfect 'receptive' and passive aspect of viewing, we are programmed though this open and near uncontrollable reflex action.

It must be noted that the best methods of enacting hypnotic suggestion are contained within the doorway to the mind via visual means.

Which is why I kicked the "TV" totally out of my life about 15 years back. It allows one to get back to the essential point of human thought and musing, with a direction and result, over that of passive acceptance of input. Ie, dump the television and reclaim your mind.

This says it all, as far as being a connective point:

http://www.physorg.com/news2872.html

When we let our children watch 'sleeping beauty' 896 times..and we do this to gain some peace from the child's constant barrage, we are literally hardwiring their brains in this pattern. The barrage of the child is there to help them learn and grow, like the monkey watching and emulating the leaders of the group, for group safety concerns and for survival tips and information. In the group the child monkey is also not constantly pressuring the single adult, IIRC, the pressure gets spread around as the little monkey grows to early adolescence, etc. A group effort.

Do we want our child having permanent aspect of sleeping beauty in their minds as a life pattern, one that is in the base levels and permanent--subconscious? I think not. The same goes for adults, but the danger for children - is extreme. People should know that they must not gain peace through licking their child's brain and sticking it to the television - They are creating programed idiocy.

When it comes to such things, I feel that the UFC and similar stuff really crosses the line. Where is that line, exactly? The fuzzier, the better - for those who play power games in those areas of mass manipulation.

For all of this is tied directly to the '100th monkey' phenomenon:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hundredth-monkey_effect

So what exactly is reality, then? How many layers does this game have?

The wikipedia entry is extremely one sided, it may be noted. Look elsewhere for the deeper explanation. It has also been noted that the critical mass point for the human equivalent is in the 100,000 range, to get something rolling as being 'real'. I'm willing to wager that the authors of the wiki entry are unwilling to accept the understanding that the media today is being utilized as a mass programming tool. Derision and lack of depth of vision posing as scientific rigor with a strictly applied limited scope of inquiry. All too common, I'm afraid. It's enough to fool or assuage the lives/fears/desires of most people, which is the point. Same for the television. It is interesting to note (one point of thousands) that Hitler broadcast the Olympics in 1936 via television, having realized (via Goebbels, etc) that this media would be better than the propaganda films that were distributed..and that one of the men in his box in the videos...was on the Warren Commission.

Here's one for you personally, NC. Same shit-different day.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFUuKfOK_ww

KBK
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Television is hypnotic, no doubt. Direct access to nerve response that goes deep into the unconscious mind.

Programmed via visual signals - directly and permanently programmed.

Sound like bullshit?

Not so:

"Scientists give flies false memories"

By directly manipulating the activity of individual neurons, scientists have given flies memories of a bad experience they never really had, according to a report in the October 16th issue of the journal Cell.

Here's the important bit:

To pinpoint the exact neurons responsible for this memory among thousands in the fly brain, the researchers used a clever technique they developed, called optogenetics, in which a simple flash of light is used to release caged-molecules present in selective neurons that then stimulate the activity of those neurons. An analogous situation, says Miesenb

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Re: Left Field Discoveries


Quote:
She garroted her first lover/assignment to death during an orgasm, at age 13.

Now, if she did it during hers, I'd be impressed.

What on Earth is the point of waiting? She could have done him in sooner, unless he was just that quick.

I am dubious as to the veracity of her claim.

KBK
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Re: Left Field Discoveries

Maybe she did. In the clip from the film..that seems to be part and parcel of the whole thing, doesn't it? She seems to be getting off fairly well on/during her garroting of Gary Oldman.

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