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jazzfan
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Jazz Lives

Jazz Lives!
Bird Lives!
Miles Lives!
Dizzy Lives!
Monk Lives!
Billie Lives!
Duke Lives!

but this section is DEAD!!

What's up with that? Come on people, let's get with it. Enough with all the posts about equipment, both real and imagined. How about discussions about the meat of matter, the heart beat of this whole stinking hobby - music, for crying out loud!

ohfourohnine
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Re: Jazz Lives

Ok, my friend, since no one else has risen to the bait and since I agree that discussions of equipment to the exclusion of the music can get pretty old I'll relate what I've been listening to this evening. Understand that when I do this I can't help but be somewhat intimidated by your usual post describing a new find. I've no new finds this time, at least none that would be new to an avid collecter like you.

I started with a CD transferred by a friend from an old Capitol LP of the Nat Cole Trio doing standards. Mono, but very pleasant. The guy did swing, and these tunes are new to my collection. Worth a little surgery to take out most of the remaining clicks and pops that my friend hadn't dealt with.

Next on my list was a Columbia reissue entitled "Ellington Jazz Party in Stereo". The usual Ellington gang of great musicians are joined for some of the selections by Jimmy Rushing and nine symphonic percussionists playing tympani, vibraphone, xylophone, glockenspiel and marimba as well as bongos, tamborine and triangle. Not only was it interesting musically, but if you want a recording to measure the sound stage and imaging of your system this beats the heck out of the average test record.

Next on the list was the Concord CD of Scott Hamilton's Quintet recorded in concert at Yamaha Hall in 1983. Great live recording.

As I type this, I'm playing some of the Louis Armstrong Highlights from the Decca Years through the headphone set-up. I never tire of this stuff.

That's the lot. Nothing new or even close to the terminally hip stuff you usually recommend, but a really good way to close the day - at least for an old guy.

As you point out so correctly, Jazz Lives - and a good thing too.

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Re: Jazz Lives

Which Jazz, cool jazz, smoooooth jazz,modern jazz,jazz blues,scat jazz,old jazz To my ears, jazz has no begining, no middle, no end.....how come noone has made hip-hop jazz. add some bling bling, add retarded lyrics, full of nasty nonsesne, hip hop jazz. Since there is a hip hopster named Jazzie Jazz ain't there, my homies?

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Re: Jazz Lives - Nat, Duke, Louie, etc.

Hi Clay,

Thanks for taking the bait.

I'm sorry if my posts tend to intimidate you but believe me that is the last thing on my mind when I'm writing them. I just want to share some of the new music that I've discovered that I feel is worthwhile and worth sharing. I will confess to a bit of horizon stretching, as in I do make an effect to go outside the boundaries of the normally "audiophile approved" artists for most of my recommendations but I only do this because most of the readers here will find out about those "auduiophile approved" artists anyway but may otherwise never hear about the artists I write about. So no harm intended.

As for your so "unhip" listening session. Nothing could be further from the truth. Nat King Cole Trio, Duke Ellington, Satchmo and Scott Hamilton is one pretty swinging session and if it's swinging, it's hip. The age of either the listener or the recording has nothing to do with it.

In keeping with your username of "Cheapskate" here are two highly recommended collections on the budget LaserLight label which may still be available. One is by the original Nat King Cole Trio and the other is by the Duke Ellington Orchestra.

The All Music Guide link for the Nat King Cole:

NKC Trio Link

The All Music Guide link for the Duke Ellington Orchestra:

Duke Link

Both sets are 5 disc collections which were available as a box or individually. The Ellington set is called "Happy Birthday Duke!" and is from two concerts, one in 1953 and the other a year later in 1954 which means no Johnny Hodges since this was recorded during his hiatus from the Duke. Not to worry since everyone picks up the slack quite nicely.

Both sets are of course in mono and have the typical half-assed LaserLight liner notes but the sound quality is surprisingly good on both sets and the material is first throughout. Well worth seeking at full price and a real steal at the LaserLight budget price.

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Re: Jazz Lives

DUP,

I believe that you are big time blues fan. I also believe that Bessie Smith is known as "the Empress of the Blues" and that Louie Armstrong is one of the most famous of all jazz musicians. Well it seems that Armstrong and Smith made several well known recordings together because jazz and blues are very closely related.

The kind of blues you happen to like, which I believe is the electric guitar based, Texas blues and the type jazz I like, which modern avant-garde may not seem at all related but way back at their roots there is a kinship, like it or not.

And by the way, Louie Armstrong is widely credited with bringing the roll of soloist to the forefront in jazz. And you know how important solos are in blues, well you have Louie to thank for that.

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Re: Jazz Lives

jazzfan-

Yes jazz lives, have you heard either of these?

ELDAR- LIVE AT THE BLUE NOTE
KASPER VILLAUME- HANDS

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
jazzfan-

Yes jazz lives, have you heard either of these?

ELDAR- LIVE AT THE BLUE NOTE
KASPER VILLAUME- HANDS

Hi Kana,

Sorry to say I haven't heard nor heard of either of these to recordings or artists. I did a little online research about them and here's what I found out.

Mr. Kasper Villaume is a Danish born pianist whose CD "Hands" was recorded in NYC in 2005 with a very fine quartet featuring Chris Potter on tenor and soprano sax and engineered by the very capable James Farber. Sounds like it could be well worth a listen. Thanks for the heads up.

Eldar, it seems, is quite another story. A very young Russian born piano virtuoso, this CD was also recorded in NYC in 2005 but Eldar was only 18 years old at the time. As I stated I haven't heard the CD but based on the AMG review I'm not in a hurry to give it a listen. Eldar (or at least the hype surrounding him) sounds too much like "the wonder kid of the month" and if I wanted that there's always pop music or better yet classical, where next great teenaged piano or violin virtuoso pops up every month or so. If Eldar's CD shows up in my library I'll give it a listen and maybe even change it's diaper.

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Re: Jazz Lives

Yup, Bessie Smith inspired Janis Joplin!!! Man could Janis Joplin wail away. Etta James is the QUEEN of the Blues, another great strong voice. Jazz just confuses me, I can't get no rthymn to grab onto, it just don't grab me. Which came first the old blues (acoustic stuff, harmonica) or jazz, Didn't blues originate way down south,telling stories of it all, migrated to Chicago etc...Jazz took off in NYC? Harlem in the 20's? All them famous jazz joints. Or was it the big band stuff that grew out of NYC clubs, Duke Ellington, and that Clarinet dude.....

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
Eldar, it seems, is quite another story. A very young Russian born piano virtuoso, this CD was also recorded in NYC in 2005 but Eldar was only 18 years old at the time. As I stated I haven't heard the CD but based on the AMG review I'm not in a hurry to give it a listen. Eldar (or at least the hype surrounding him) sounds too much like "the wonder kid of the month" and if I wanted that there's always pop music or better yet classical, where next great teenaged piano or violin virtuoso pops up every month or so. If Eldar's CD shows up in my library I'll give it a listen and maybe even change it's diaper.

Well, isn't that just dandy. An opinion formed on a review and you haven't even heard a single note of the artists work. Didn't know you only listened to "reviewer approved" music. I believe a lot of the music you do listen to was performed by artists whose releases when they were quite young are now considered classics.

RG

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Re: Jazz Lives


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Well, isn't that just dandy. An opinion formed on a review and you haven't even heard a single note of the artists work. Didn't know you only listened to "reviewer approved" music. I believe a lot of the music you do listen to was performed by artists whose releases when they were quite young are now considered classics.

Au contraire, there's a very big difference between the young Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday both whom recorded at very early ages and many of today's young virtuosoes. And that difference is the present day music industry's massive hype machine. The jazz scene is filled with many very technically capable players, several of whom reached their highly refined skill level at a very early age, the late Hilton Ruiz was one a good example of just such a musician, but in jazz it's the combination of advanced technique and the ability to convey emotion while doing it with one's unique sound that makes a great player.

The AMG reviewer did not feel that Eldar had achieved this often elusive goal and based on that I did state that I would give the CD a listen but that I was in no great hurry. So yes, tempered with one's knowledge, a well written review can be a useful tool but one still needs to hear the music for oneself.

Kana, I do apologize for being rather rude but I don't apologize for the fact that I don't easily buy into record company hype. I've been listening to jazz for over 30 years and have seen many young lions come and go and Eldar is the not first nor will he be the last. The best thing that one can hope for is that he lives up to all the hype before his record contract runs out.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
Kana, I do apologize for being rather rude but I don't apologize for the fact that I don't easily buy into record company hype. I've been listening to jazz for over 30 years and have seen many young lions come and go and Eldar is the not first nor will he be the last. The best thing that one can hope for is that he lives up to all the hype before his record contract runs out.

jazzfan- no need for an apology. I don't buy into the hype either, but the two CDs I asked about are on Bob Parlocha's current top 40 list. I love live recordings, so I thought Eldar's Blue Note recording might be worth a listen.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
Yup, Bessie Smith inspired Janis Joplin!!! Man could Janis Joplin wail away. Etta James is the QUEEN of the Blues, another great strong voice. Jazz just confuses me, I can't get no rthymn to grab onto, it just don't grab me. Which came first the old blues (acoustic stuff, harmonica) or jazz, Didn't blues originate way down south,telling stories of it all, migrated to Chicago etc...Jazz took off in NYC? Harlem in the 20's? All them famous jazz joints. Or was it the big band stuff that grew out of NYC clubs, Duke Ellington, and that Clarinet dude.....

Dup,

As one blues lover to another, check out Coltrane's "Blue Train". Also Oscar Peterson's "Night Train". Charles Mingus "Blues and Roots". There's a lot of great stuff out there, you just gotta expand your horizons.

Trust me, this from a guy who thinks Son House was the King and Willie Kent was the crown prince (though just what that makes Muddy, I'm not sure ). BTW, I'll see you Etta and raise you Koko Taylor!!

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Re: Jazz Lives

And a Shemika Copeland thrown in for balance, some Joe Bonamassa, some Roy Buchannan,some Otis Rush, Lonnie Brooks,Jimmie D. Jane ...so much great stuff so little time KokoTaylor is terrific, got some of her also, waiting fro a stack of R.L. Burnside....Sirius Blues 74 is a great place to hear some stuff ya missed. So is WXPN blues Show out of Philly, on Saturdays. Check out my firend's Big win at HOB in Chicago a few weeks ago!! www.mattoree.com National competition winner over 3,000 contestants, down to 6 in Chicago, Matt smoked em'!!!! I'm glad I was there to see it happen. He's on his way to prominance and recognition..cool due incredible musican. One of my favorite SACD is Albert King w/ Stevie Ray Vaughan!!! WOW...SACD of like a 1987 session, get it, you'll love it!!! Called Sessions

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
And a Shemika Copeland thrown in for balance, some Joe Bonamassa, some Roy Buchannan,some Otis Rush, Lonnie Brooks,Jimmie D. Jane ...so much great stuff so little time KokoTaylor is terrific, got some of her also, waiting fro a stack of R.L. Burnside....Sirius Blues 74 is a great place to hear some stuff ya missed. So is WXPN blues Show out of Philly, on Saturdays. Check out my firend's Big win at HOB in Chicago a few weeks ago!! www.mattoree.com National competition winner over 3,000 contestants, down to 6 in Chicago, Matt smoked em'!!!! I'm glad I was there to see it happen. He's on his way to prominance and recognition..cool due incredible musican. One of my favorite SACD is Albert King w/ Stevie Ray Vaughan!!! WOW...SACD of like a 1987 session, get it, you'll love it!!! Called Sessions

Cool link, and congrats to friend. I'm not into blues rock as much as I once was, but still like a bit every now and then.

Speaking of female blues singers, ever heard of Valerie Wellington? She was a classically trained singer who cut an album back in the early to mid 80s with Magic Slim and his band titled "Million Dollar Secret". She was phenominal but, unfortunately, died tragically in a car accident not long after cutting the album.

But still, man, give Mingus a listen. He'll blow you away!!

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Re: Jazz Lives

I'm not sure what you were expecting folks would post in response. According to my credit card statement, I'm doing my part to keep jazz alive. Some of my latest acquisitions that I'd recommend others check out are:

Gary Smulyan's Hidden Treasures on Reservoir. Smulyan's a bari player much more in the Pepper Adams tradition than the Gerry Mulligan tradition. This is a bari-bass-drums trio, so Smulyan's very front and center and desrves it.

Trumpeter Phil Dizack's Beyond a Dream on Fresh Sounds. Dizack and the bassist on this recording, Joe Sanders, are products of Milwaukee High School of the Arts jazz program. Dizack wrote 8 of the 9 tracks on this. His playing reminds me of Freddie Hubbard but the songs remind me more of Charles Tolliver or Woody Shaw.

Peter Madsen's Sphere Essence on Playscape. Solo piano Monk tribute that makes me think of Monk, not Bill Evans doing Monk.

Anthony Wilson's Savinity on Groove Note. Son of Gerald Wilson is a mean guitarist. This is an organ trio recording produced by Joe Harley. Honest, straight ahead stuff.

Toshiko Akiyoshi Jazz Orchestra's Last Live in Blue Note Tokyo on Warner Music Japan. A hard to find, expensive import of what I understand was the farewell performance of her big band. I've always appreciated her big band because there seems to be a space or air to her arrangements that contrasts strongly with the prevailing Basie/Jones-Lewis sound without being bloodless like I find some Gil Evans.

Venerable west coast stalwart Gerald Wilson gos to New York to record In My Time on Mack Avenue using Vanguard Orchestra vets and others. Play loud.

A couple reissues:

The Pepper-Knepper Quintet on Fresh Sounds is from '58 with Wynton Kelly, Doug Watkins and Elvin Jones. My favorite bari player of all time really digging in.

Andrew Hill's Blue Black on Test of Time records. A '75 reissue of a quartet session with the obscure Jimmy Vass on saxes and flute and the equally obscure Chris White on bass. I prefer this to Hill's recent things on Blue Note. It has more drive, seems less dirge-like. Almost as good as Shades.

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Re: Jazz Lives

Acid Jazz could be considered hip hop jazz. The important factor being the practitioners actually can and do play their instruments. I would invite you to listen to Groove Collective, Brooklyn Funk Essentials or Greg Franks. I have noted your inability to "get" into Jazz. You are missing out on a lot of very good music.
I could make fun of your infatuation with the blues. Which kind of blues; the boring kind or the very boring kind? 12 bar 14 bar it's all very boring to me.
On a serious note. Give George Benson, Body Talk a listen. If you like guitar playing as much as you say, you should love this recording. BTW this was recorded before George started singing.
It's DJ Jazzy Jeff!

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Re: Jazz Lives


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Acid Jazz could be considered hip hop jazz.

I have read that Greg Osby has added rap to a few of his jazz albums.


Quote:
I could make fun of your infatuation with the blues.

The root of jazz music is in the blues. Actually, the blues has been an influence on most music of the last century, not just jazz.

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Re: Jazz Lives

I've been hearing one of the "roots" of Jazz in church on Sunday since I was very young. It's called "Gospel". I was yanking DUP's chain because of his feelings about Jazz. I have lots of blues in my collection, I also have lots of jazz in my collection. At one time I made my living playing in a band that played a lot of the blues.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
I've been hearing one of the "roots" of Jazz in church on Sunday since I was very young. It's called "Gospel". I was yanking DUP's chain because of his feelings about Jazz. I have lots of blues in my collection, I also have lots of jazz in my collection. At one time I made my living playing in a band that played a lot of the blues.

Great! I can stop worrying about you!

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Re: Jazz Lives

Great! I can stop worrying about you!

My ex-wives and family wish they could say that about me. Thank you. Did I pass?

uofmtiger
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Re: Jazz Lives

You did good!

JoeE SP9
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Re: Jazz Lives

I guess I'm just a recidivist. Straight up blues still becomes boring to me after a short while. Jazz on the other hand always holds my interest no matter how long I've been listening.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
I guess I'm just a recidivist. Straight up blues still becomes boring to me after a short while. Jazz on the other hand always holds my interest no matter how long I've been listening.

You know, I never thought I would feel this way, but I do as well. I mean, I've been listening to the blues for 30+ years. I did a stint as a blues reviewer for on online site in the mid-90s, *love* the blues.

But just about anything bores me after awhile except for jazz. The layers, the intracacies, the complexities - nothing really compares for me.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:

Quote:
I guess I'm just a recidivist. Straight up blues still becomes boring to me after a short while. Jazz on the other hand always holds my interest no matter how long I've been listening.

You know, I never thought I would feel this way, but I do as well. I mean, I've been listening to the blues for 30+ years. I did a stint as a blues reviewer for on online site in the mid-90s, *love* the blues.

But just about anything bores me after awhile except for jazz. The layers, the intracacies, the complexities - nothing really compares for me.

I prefer the music defined as jazz, too. However, the definition or the line between the two is put there by our personal definitions of blues or jazz. Miles Davis, as one example, is considered a jazz performer. However, he brought the blues structure and "soul" into much (some say all) of his music. WC Handy is often called "The Father of the Blues", but most of his music is considered jazz by today's standards.

My point being that I do like music that has the blues style in its interpretation. Whether that is Sinatra or Holiday lagging behind the beat or a BB King solo on "Live at the Regal".

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Re: Jazz Lives

It's no fun when we agree. I have what my neighbors call wierd taste. There is a different word I prefer but no matter. Music doesn't have to be blues oriented or related to catch my attention. It just has to please my ears. Pleasing my ears could require anything from Gregorian chants to Techno or Sills' doing La Traviata. I just never liked Hendrix and Bill Munroe makes me want to cut off my ears and run away.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
It's no fun when we agree. I have what my neighbors call wierd taste.

Ha! We are the same, but I like Bill Monroe!

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:

Quote:
It's no fun when we agree. I have what my neighbors call wierd taste.

Ha! We are the same, but I like Bill Monroe!


Bill Munroe is to weird even for me.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
I prefer the music defined as jazz, too. However, the definition or the line between the two is put there by our personal definitions of blues or jazz. Miles Davis, as one example, is considered a jazz performer. However, he brought the blues structure and "soul" into much (some say all) of his music. WC Handy is often called "The Father of the Blues", but most of his music is considered jazz by today's standards.

My point being that I do like music that has the blues style in its interpretation. Whether that is Sinatra or Holiday lagging behind the beat or a BB King solo on "Live at the Regal".

No doubt, no doubt. I love blues based Jazz, as well. But "the blues", as in Chicago, Delta, West Coast, etc., is not quite the same, and certainly lacks a number of dimensions that we see in jazz "blues". Consider, for example, Hank Mobley's "Dig Dis". Definitely a rather bluesy number, but certainly more than a 12-bar blues.

That said, I spent some time the last couple days listening Allman Brothers' RoIOs in honor of the recently released "Eat a Peach" Deluxe Edition that includes a live show available "bootlegged" for years. That was a pretty jazzy blues band!!

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Re: Jazz Lives

Hey BluesDaddy it occurs to me that you might be able to answer this. How come the first Allman's album was called "Idlewild South?" I'm from NYC and the only Idlewild I know is the airport whose name changed to JFK in the sixties. What's the significance of "Idlewild" in Georgia?

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
Hey BluesDaddy it occurs to me that you might be able to answer this. How come the first Allman's album was called "Idlewild South?" I'm from NYC and the only Idlewild I know is the airport whose name changed to JFK in the sixties. What's the significance of "Idlewild" in Georgia?

Actually, it's the second Allmans' album that is "Idlewild South". Their first album was simply "The Allman Brothers Band". The reference is to a farm in Georgia that they used to frequent which was, oddly enough, named after the airport.

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Re: Jazz Lives

Thank you sir. I never knew that.

JoeE SP9
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Re: Jazz Lives

The first one has an early version of Whipping Post on it. I too am a big Allman Brothers fan. After Duane and Berry died I lost interest. The Allman's LP's and CD's I have get frequent playing time here.

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Re: Jazz Lives


Quote:
The first one has an early version of Whipping Post on it. I too am a big Allman Brothers fan. After Duane and Berry died I lost interest. The Allman's LP's and CD's I have get frequent playing time here.

Well, the Duane era is tops, but "Eat A Peach" is killer, as is "Brothers and Sisters". I also really have liked their last studio recording "Hittin' the Note". As for live? These guys have smoked since Gregg got off the stuff. Warren Hayes and Derek Trucks are a pretty potent combo.

JoeE SP9
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Re: Jazz Lives

I've got Eat A Peach and Brothers And Sisters. I like both very much.

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Re: Jazz Lives

By far, my favorite live jazz recordings are by the Kenny Barron Trio:

The Perfect Set - Live at Bradley's I and II

They're both on my personal records-to-die-for list.

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