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nbaptista007
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impedance

My system is doing a huummm.Is it possible a impedance problem between my Naim CD 5 and my Densen B 110?Or all the impedance is standard?

Jan Vigne
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Re: impedance

Naim is not standard to anything else. However, the problem is probably a ground loop. What sort of cables are you running through your system? Do you have a cable TV box connected to this system? Are the two pieces of equipment connected to the same AC outlet? Has this just started or have you made any changes in the system which initiated this hum?

Monty
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Re: impedance

See if any of this looks like it will help.

nbaptista007
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Re: impedance


Quote:
What sort of cables are you running through your system? Do you have a cable TV box connected to this system? Are the two pieces of equipment connected to the same AC outlet? Has this just started or have you made any changes in the system which initiated this hum?


This has just started. I don

Jan Vigne
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Re: impedance

You have to have some idea where the ground loop is located to begin repairing the situation. The best way to isolate the cause is to disconnect all the interconnects and AC cables in your system and begin replacing them one at a time. If the cables are causing the loop, you should find one cable that creates the noise. The possibilites for where a ground loop can exist are innumerable. You could have a bad connector which has oxidized. Just removing the connector and reseating it might solve the problem. If you have plugged and unplugged the AC lines recently, you might have a power cable reversed in polarity or is sitting too close to a parallel run of AC/interconnect. As much as possible you should dress your cables so that all power cables are separted from line and speaker level cables. Line level should also be kept apart from speaker level. AC cables should cross all others at right angles only.

I would begin by unplugging the system and starting to put it back together. If that doesn't allow you to isolate where the loop occurs, put "Solving AC Ground Loops" into a search engine. There should be several sites that provide more specific information about the cause and solutions to ground loops. Read a few sites and then tackle the system again. If that doesn't help, it's possible you have a bad capacitor in one of the pieces of equipment.

.

nbaptista007
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Re: impedance


Quote:
If that doesn't help, it's possible you have a bad capacitor in one of the pieces of equipment.

.


in the CD player,for example?
BTW,I found a good site about earth loops

Jan Vigne
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Re: impedance

You could determine the existence of a bad cap in the CD player by connecting it to another system. Also while stripping down the system, you can usually determine if there's a bad cap in the CD player by swapping cables. If cables don't solve the problem and it stays with the CD player, then there's a pretty good chance the CD player needs some work. Certainly if the noise travels with the player to another system, the player is at fault.

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