LATEST ADDITIONS

Jonathan Scull  |  Jul 27, 1999  |  0 comments
So where and on exactly what should you plunk your precious audiophile components when you get them home? And why even bother?
Robert Levine  |  Jul 27, 1999  |  0 comments
MOZART: Così fan tutte
Véronique Gens, Fiordiligi; Bernarda Fink, Dorabella; Werner Güra, Ferrando; Marcel Boone, Guglielmo; Pietro Spagnoli; Graciela Oddone, Despina; Kölner Kammerchor, Concerto Köln, René Jacobs
Harmonia Mundi 951663.65 (3 CDs). 1999. Barbara Valentin, artistic dir.; Mark Hohn, eng. DDD. TT: 3:21:09
Performance *****
Sonics *****
John Atkinson  |  Jul 27, 1999  |  0 comments
It was the road signs alongside I-44 that first caught my attention, each with its twin supports neatly snapped halfway up. Then I saw the outlet center east of Oklahoma City, smashed flat as if struck by the mother of all baseball bats swung by a careless god.
Stereophile  |  Jul 25, 1999  |  112 comments

Audiophile labels spend a good deal of effort trying to improve the transfer of music from the master tape to CD, DVD, or LP. Is this important to you?

Do you prefer special "audiophile" editions of recordings you buy?
Yes, by a long shot
46% (112 votes)
Yes, most of the time
28% (69 votes)
Yes, once in a while
19% (46 votes)
Don't really care
3% (8 votes)
Never buy them
4% (9 votes)
Total votes: 244
Jon Iverson  |  Jul 25, 1999  |  0 comments
According to a report released last week by Cahners In-Stat Group, a high-tech market research firm, the market for personal digital music players using audio compression technologies will experience a tremendous increase in growth through the next several years. Nearly $800 million in player sales are expected in 2003, spurred largely by widespread Internet access. The report also states that products in this segment will initially focus on downloading technologies like MP3, and over the next 12 months consumers should expect to see more features integrated into the players such as FM tuners, increased storage capacity, and security systems like Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI).
Barry Willis  |  Jul 25, 1999  |  0 comments
Yet another major music company has joined the digital downloading stampede, in the wake of the Secure Digital Music Initiative's (SDMI) recent progress toward formulating copyright standards. On July 19, Universal Music Group announced its intention to make its titles available for downloading to the coming generation of portable audio players. New devices from Diamond Multimedia, Toshiba, and Panasonic—all expected to hit the market by the winter holiday season—will play encrypted tunes from Universal and other big labels.
Jon Iverson  |  Jul 25, 1999  |  0 comments
The Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI) appears to be the antidote to many a record executive's worst audio poison: legions of young music fans downloading digital audio files off the Internet and passing them around with no regard to copyright restrictions. But what might be the answer to some companies' prayers could prove to be the Big Brother nightmare feared by others.
Stereophile Staff  |  Jul 25, 1999  |  0 comments
The age of digital music downloads has begun in earnest. On July 20, EMI Recorded Music announced that it has signed a deal with Digital On-Demand and its subsidiary, RedDotNet Inc., to make the EMI catalog available for downloading to kiosks in music stores. The kiosks will be equipped with CD "burners" where customers can copy EMI recordings not in stock in the stores. They will also be able to print out the original cover art and liner notes. Discs can be copied at high speed in 5 to 15 minutes using RedDotNet's technology, the announcement noted.
Stereophile Staff  |  Jul 25, 1999  |  0 comments
While decidedly "niche products," as Martin Colloms describes them, single-ended (SE) tube amplifiers have still found a happy home in many audiophile systems. But a trap awaits those who wish to evaluate the differences between an SE and a solid-state or push-pull tube amplifier, or between two SE amps. In "The Unseen Variable," Colloms digs to the bottom of this complicated matter.
Stereophile  |  Jul 18, 1999  |  80 comments

Audiophiles all have to start somewhere, and some of us may have even spread the word a little. Have you?

Have you ever converted anyone into an audiophile? How did you do it?
Converted a relative
12% (14 votes)
Converted a friend
46% (55 votes)
Converted a roommate
1% (1 vote)
Converted a customer
1% (1 vote)
Other
13% (15 votes)
No conversions yet
28% (34 votes)
Total votes: 120

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