LATEST ADDITIONS

Filed under
Stephen Mejias Posted: Nov 07, 2005 0 comments
As I was leaving Maxwell's last night, I ran into Melissa.
Filed under
Stephen Mejias Posted: Nov 07, 2005 3 comments
"I was at Maxwell's last night for no more than three hours, and it made me terribly sick."
"What’s Maxwell's?" JA asks.
"Oh," I say, "It's a rock and roll club in Jersey."
"Thank you for assuming that I'm hip."
I laugh. "I’ve become so allergic to cigarette smoke. I woke up this morning coughing blood, and I've got a horrible headache now."
"You must have some insect genes."
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 07, 2005 4 comments
Chris Sommovigo from Signals Super-Fi passed this one my way. A great read.
Filed under
Jon Iverson Posted: Nov 07, 2005 0 comments
Rarely does a day pass when Wes Phillips doesn't send his pals a bunch of emails with links to stuff he's found while Web surfing. Frequently it is audio-related, but even when it's not, there's usually something there worth checking out.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 07, 2005 0 comments
Hey, it's only streamed audio, but Public Radio Fan is easy to navigate and offers lots of variety.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 07, 2005 0 comments
Other than making you look like a dork, that is.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
On November 1, Window OS expert Mark Russinovich revealed that his root kit detection utility had uncovered the presence of some well-hidden, poorly written code that was clogging computer resources and could potentially crash his computer or, if removed, disable his CD drive.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
The hits just keep on coming in fair-use land. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has proposed legislation that requires that all digital radio content be encrypted, including works that now exist in the public domain. The proposed legislation would apply to satellite radio (Sirius, XM) as well as conventional terrestrial broadcasting. As proposed by the RIAA, content could be recorded only in blocks of 30 minutes or longer, and the recorded data could not be exported from the recording device (in other words, you could only play it back on the device you had recorded it on—no more recording programs on your hi-fi to listen to on your way to work). To learn more about this legislation, go to Public Knowledge's two-page summary. While you're there, you might want to check out "Why These Issues Matter."
Filed under
John Atkinson Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
The 2006 edition of the Stereophile Buyer's Guide is out now. Listing the specifications of more than 5000 audio components within its 212 large-format pages, the Buyer's Guide is exclusively concerned with products for music reproduction, as opposed to the bangs, bonks, and battle noises typical of movie soundtracks.
Filed under
Jason Victor Serinus Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
Film Music Radio (FMR), one of the newest outposts in the expanding galaxy of cyberspace music media, emerged from the digital ethers on September 13. The Internet radio station streams film and television soundtracks around the clock, and offers genre-based block programs and unique DJ-hosted specialty shows.

Pages