LATEST ADDITIONS

Wes Phillips  |  Dec 19, 2005  |  1 comments
I've seen this attributed to the USAF, Quantas, and the Marine Air Corps. Personally, I think they're too perfect to be real, although my buddy Steve (who was a Marine pilot and AvTech) sez these are plausible.
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 19, 2005  |  2 comments
Probably a sign of my misspent youth, but I know that nothing good can come from a project where Japanese scientists drill towards the center of the earth.
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 19, 2005  |  0 comments
How many decimal places can you take it? The Pi trainer can get you further.
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 19, 2005  |  0 comments
Google Middle Earth.
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 19, 2005  |  0 comments
Stretchable silicon gonna be the next big craze.
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 19, 2005  |  0 comments
It's Double-Tongued Word Wrester—one-stop shopping for slang, jargon, and geek speak of all categories. Why didn't I think of this?
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 19, 2005  |  0 comments
Tastes like "physics."
Stephen Mejias  |  Dec 18, 2005  |  2 comments
1. Sonic Youth — my favorite band — is working on a new album.
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 18, 2005  |  0 comments
This time last year the music industry was ready to celebrate. Compact disc sales were up for the first time in years, peer-to-peer file-sharing networks were reeling from lawsuits, ringtone sales were proving unexpectedly profitable, and legitimate (paid-for, that is) downloads were rising. But this year, Jim Urie, president of Universal Music Group, told The Wall Street Journal that Christmas 2005 was "a bleak holiday season at the end of a bleak year."
Wes Phillips  |  Dec 18, 2005  |  0 comments
On December 16, Congressmen James Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and John Conyers (D-MI) introduced HR 4569, a bill "to require certain analog conversion devices to preserve digital content security measures"—in other words, to mandate that electronic devices and software manufactured after a yet-to-be-specified date respond to a copy protection system or watermark embedded in a video signal and pass that along when converting the signal to analog or vice versa. It also mandates copy protection for analog signals. This is referred to as "plugging the analog hole," since analog signals, even those converted from protected high-definition digital sources, are currently "in the clear" or open for copying. (Standard-definition signals can be protected by systems like Macrovision, but no such protection exists for high-definition signals.)

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