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overground55
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How do you reduce rattle on items in your office from a subwoofer?

I purchased a Polk Audio PSW10 10" sub for my office, and I installed rubber feet on it (SVS SoundPath Subwoofer Isolation System) to reduce the spread of bass through the floor. This hasn't helped, so I'm thinking I'll need to add padding to items in my room that are effected by the bass. This includes chairs, items on desk, etc... Any suggestions on the best way to do this?

geoffkait
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Put springs under the

Put springs under the subwoofer. Problem solved!

Dorsia777
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Not trying to be a jerk…

You could turn the bass down…or use a little felt around the office where the rattling is most annoying.

Tektixon
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get superglue and duct tape -

get superglue and duct tape - lol - what did you expect in buying speakers which deliver the type of response curve which shakes the ground you stand on. Btw the resonance carries to next door and beyond. Have you recieved complaints about building vibration yet?

On a kinder note put some stick-on foam dots or pads where the rattling exists. it may reduce vibration of things which want to dance around being placed where the vibration travels mostly.

A solution for the subby is to go buy a 15mm or 1/2" thick foam padding same density as Yoga Mat and put you subby bon that. The foam is hard enough not to sag or deform with subby weight so go to a hardware and chexck out what they sell. dont buy hard solid styrene foam. You want something which is a shock absorber but doesnt kill audio output.

Dont turn down the speakers. That's negative value. When you do test your result maybe turn them up and put on some testing deeper bassy thrash metal to test the vibration solutuion - oh and do this when everyone has left the office - you dont want to create a negative response which culminates in new boss rule of reducing the audio gain you have currently.

ChrisS
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Try anti vibration pads...

...or footers for washing machines.

ChrisS
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Try anti vibration pads...

...or footers for washing machines.

r042wal
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Putting isolators under a

Putting isolators under a subwoofer would indicate there is a substantial amount of cabinet resonance going on but I don't believe you will find this the case with better made subs where the cabinets are reinforced with bracing and have thick walls made from dense materials.

IMY, it is sound pressure waves from the cone of the sub that are setting up the oscillations causing objects in the room to vibrate and rattle. I put this to the test using my SB-2000 Pro sub and isolators made with aluminum disks separated by 5 springs each. (Nobsound 4PCS Silver Aluminum Spring Speakers Spikes Isolation Stand)

If there was any change or improvement, it was marginal because everything that rattled and made noise before continued to rattle and make noise.

geoffkait
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Maybe five was too many

Maybe five was too many springs, have you tried using only four springs? Or even three springs? Lower the resonant frequency.

r042wal
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No, I never removed springs

No, I never removed springs although I had considered it. What made me hold back is the sub is slightly compressing the four isolators so essentially, the sub is floating right now. I thought if I removed even one spring from each isolator, the sub would bottom out. What's your take on that?

Isn't the resonant frequency an inherent characteristic of the sub? I'm not sure I follow but with several items vibrating I can't be hitting their natural resonant frequency all all once.

It reminds of our central a/c which only makes two items on our walls rattle. I assumed we hit their resonant frequency and my wife solved the problem with little pieces of felt.

geoffkait
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You should be able to remove

You should be able to remove one spring, maybe two, springs can generally be compressed to almost half uncompressed length or maybe two thirds uncompressed length. You can compress the springs but you don’t want any coils to touch. Depends on spring rate and load. “Slightly compressed” sounds like too many springs. You want the sub to be kind of bouncy, not jittery.

The idea is not to “float the sub” per se but to isolate the sub. Mass on spring mechanical filter. For a given spring with a known spring rate there is an “ideal load.” The more springs the higher the total spring rate and resonant frequency of system.

r042wal
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Update:

Update:
With 5 springs my sub was putting tension on the isolators but not compressing them. I used the term 'float' because I could touch any point of the sub and it would move.

I removed one spring in each isolator and the sub compressed the isolators by at least half where the sub was definitely floating this time.

I can't say I noticed a difference. My SPL showed 85 and thanks to my wife, I have a lot of odds and ends that like to rattle. SVS has a good article on this very subject and they say it can be a combination of the sub transferring to the floor or sound pressure ways as I suspected.

It's not the end of the world for me but appreciate the comments. Thanks.

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