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Terrazen
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Decibels Sound to Noise Ratio

I've been discussing this recently with a friend, first is there a difference between DB and DB(SNR)? I know that decibels is a measure of loudness, but does a higher DB(SNR) equate to better sound quality, due to less noise?

geoffkait
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There are many ways to

There are many ways to characterize the quality of the sound. Technically the Signal to Noise Ratio is a measure of the noise in a given signal, or you could also say signal over noise + distortion. Frequency response, dynamic range (as opposed to loudness) and channel separation are other technical parameters used to quantify sound quality, among many others. But audiophiles also have a large lexicon that can also be used to subjectively characterize sound quality. Transparency, harshness, separation of instruments, dimensionality, things of that nature.

Terrazen
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So essential db (SNR) is a

So essential db (SNR) is a measure between the sound and the amount of noise that is heard within that sound? Which in turn is a way to measure quality the better the SNR the better the noise quality, or lack of noise within the sound?

Terrazen
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So essential db (SNR) is a

So essential db (SNR) is a measure between the sound and the amount of noise that is heard within that sound? Which in turn is a way to measure quality the better the SNR the better the noise quality, or lack of noise within the sound?

geoffkait
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The word “sound” is a little

The word “sound” is a little misleading. The word “signal” is a technical term. If you looked at the “signal” on an oscilloscope it would appear as a sine wave. That’s due to the alternating voltage and current in all or almost all audio cables and wires. The “sound” is what you hear in the room AFTER the “signal” has reached the speakers and caused the speaker diaphragms to vibrate. The *audio signal* that travels through wire and cable is not the audio waveform, it’s alternating current and voltage.

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