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Emmett Scully
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Last seen: 7 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: Mar 1 2021 - 3:16am
Building a listening room

Hello,

I want to have a go at making and selling boutique speakers, so I'm going to build a listening room. I wanted to ask the knowledgable people here for advice.

The goal is to have a room which will allow for the clearest evaluation of speakers. To this end I want the walls to be reflective, but for there not to be any issues with the sound which would mask the sound quality.

The internal dimensions in feet are 14x22.5x36.5
The walls and floor will be concrete.
I'm thinking the roof could just be galvanised sheets.

My question is; how can I get a good in room frequency response, i.e. not too rolled off at the top end.

This needs to be cost effective and non-resonant.

Maybe Plywood over the concrete would even the response, and then the right paint over that might improve matters further.

Any thoughts?

Tim Link
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Joined: May 15 2019 - 2:09pm
Emmett Scully wrote:
Emmett Scully wrote:

Hello,

I want to have a go at making and selling boutique speakers, so I'm going to build a listening room. I wanted to ask the knowledgable people here for advice.

The goal is to have a room which will allow for the clearest evaluation of speakers. To this end I want the walls to be reflective, but for there not to be any issues with the sound which would mask the sound quality.

The internal dimensions in feet are 14x22.5x36.5
The walls and floor will be concrete.
I'm thinking the roof could just be galvanised sheets.

My question is; how can I get a good in room frequency response, i.e. not too rolled off at the top end.

This needs to be cost effective and non-resonant.

Maybe Plywood over the concrete would even the response, and then the right paint over that might improve matters further.

Any thoughts?

I plugged your room into an online RT60 calculator: http://www.csgnetwork.com/acousticreverbdelaycalc.html

By choosing unpainted concrete for the walls, carpet on pad for the floor and an acoustic tile suspended ceiling it gives a reasonably even 0.3 second RT60 for the range between 125Hz and 4000Hz. You could lengthen that if desired by not covering the entire floor with carpet. RT60 will get longer as you go below 125Hz so some bass traps in the corners could lower that and keep the room sounding properly bright and clear. If you paint the concrete it becomes more reverberant because you seal the pores. It can't be undone once it's painted. You could instead add painted plywood panels as needed to add reverberation. Ideally those could be curved to make polycylindrical diffusers for first reflection points.

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