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geoffkait
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Graphene - What's it all mean, Jelly Bean?

The new Synergistic Research Black fuse and the new Cerious Cables are making a big splash over on Audiogon. They both employ Graohene, a "super material" in their construction. And guess what? You can make Graphene in the basement. Hel-loo!

Geoff Kait
Machina Dynamica

geoffkait
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Last seen: 1 day 15 hours ago
Joined: Apr 29 2008 - 5:10am
I know what you're thinking - What in the hell is Graphene?

Graphene (/ˈɡræf.iːn/)[1][2] is an allotrope of carbon in the form of a two-dimensional, atomic-scale, honey-comb lattice in which one atom forms each vertex. It is the basic structural element of other allotropes, including graphite, charcoal, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes. It can also be considered as an indefinitely large aromatic molecule, the ultimate case of the family of flat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

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Graphene and its band structure and Dirac Cones, effect of a grid on doping
Graphene has many extraordinary properties. It is about 100 times stronger than the strongest steel with a hypothetical thickness of 3.35Å which is equal to the thickness of the graphene sheet.[3] It conducts heat and electricity efficiently and is nearly transparent.[4] Researchers have identified the bipolar transistor effect, ballistic transport of charges and large quantum oscillations in the material.

Scientists have theorized about graphene for decades. It has likely been unknowingly produced in small quantities for centuries, through the use of pencils and other similar applications of graphite. It was originally observed in electron microscopes in 1962, but not studied further.[5] The material was later rediscovered, isolated and characterized in 2004 by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov at the University of Manchester.[6][7] Research was informed by existing theoretical descriptions of its composition, structure and properties.[8] High-quality graphene proved to be surprisingly easy to isolate, making more research possible. This work resulted in the two winning the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2010 "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene."[9]

The global market for graphene is reported to have reached $9 million by 2014 with most sales in the semiconductor, electronics, battery energy and composites industries.[10]

Note: the Wikipedia page doesn't mention electrical conductivity of Graphene which is very high. From another source,

"In addition, graphene has excellent electrical conductivity: at room temperature, electrons move through it up to 200 times faster than through silicon. Its enormous potential in electronics has triggered much research effort."

Cheers,

Geoff Kait
Machina Dynamica

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