Wes Phillips

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 5 comments
The Anat Reference Professional incorporates a powered subwoofer. This is the amp module.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 3 comments
It's an acoustic fourth-order Linkwitz-Riley, crossing over at 1.75kHz, if you're keeping score at home.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 3 comments
Geva believes that measurements don't lie—well, he allows that they can fib, but that a competent engineer should be able to interpret them with great accuracy. He uses aluminum and ballistic allow instead of wood or MDF, he said, because they are the "most resonant free, deadest, stiffest, strongest, least diffractive, and most sonically desirable materials ever found."
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 0 comments
The woofer for the Anat Ref Pro and Studio II is also an exclusive YGA design. "From the voice coil to the surround and cone, the woofer is the ultimate expression of what can be produced for our enclosures and sub-amp technology."
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 1 comments
This precision sander puts the lovely exterior finish on the Anat's panels. Yes, the machine does the grunt work, but factory manager Roger Wertz supervises the entire time with his hand on a deadman's switch.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 5 comments
YGA gets its open air measurements by lifting the speaker under measurement away from that pesky floor boundary with a forklift.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 5 comments
I don't quite know what I expected, but YGA's "factory" was not what I expected. I put factory in quotes because that sounds all automated and industrial, whereas YG's speakers are essentially built by hand. The speakers are constructed of aircraft grade 6061 T651 aluminum and the baffles are milled out of ballistic-grade aluminum/titanium alloy. On the day I arrived, the factory was being prepped for the delivery of a huge CNC station and a ceiling-mounted crane system to move large sheets of stock from station to station. At the moment, large panels are turned into speaker-sized parts by an outside contractor, but Geva prefers to do everything in-house so that he can assure himself that things are done to his specifications.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 1 comments
The other side of the tweeter assembly.
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 30, 2008 4 comments
Every time I passed the parts bin with this bad boy in it, I did a double take. Man, that's big!
Filed under
Wes Phillips Posted: Jul 28, 2008 0 comments
PSB came to New York in late July to debut its new line of loudspeakers, giving journos an advance peek at them before the official launch at the CEDIA Conference in early September. Paul Barton, showing a lot of emotion for a normally reserved Canadian, was frankly in love with the four new loudspeakers.

Pages

X
Enter your Stereophile.com username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading