Sam Tellig

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Robert Harley Sam Tellig Posted: Aug 08, 1995 Published: Aug 08, 1985 0 comments
The $395 NAIT, rated at 20Wpc, is a good-sounding little amp. It's very open and spacious-sounding, but, like the $250 Rotel RA-820BX, sometimes sounds a little hard in the upper registers.
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Sam Tellig Posted: Feb 06, 2001 0 comments
The year was 1948. As a six-year-old, I haunted record stores with my Uncle Stan. A quiet bank teller from Manchester, England, childless himself and quite overpowered by my Aunt Emily, Uncle Stan shared with me his love of music and movies.
John Marks Sam Tellig Posted: Dec 03, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 4 comments
For the high-performance audio market, it makes a lot of sense to process digital audio data via sophisticated software running on a dedicated personal computer. Which brings us to Parasound's Halo CD 1 CD player ($4500). Some might find it questionable to release today, as one's first digital-disc player, a machine that plays only "Red Book" CDs, rather than a universal or near-universal (non–Blu-ray) player.
Sam Tellig Posted: Apr 25, 2013 Published: Jan 01, 2013 1 comments
With Peachtree Audio's new nova125 integrated amplifier, most decisions are made for you.

Need a DAC with three S/PDIF inputs (two coax, one optical)? An asynchronous USB DAC? A line stage? A tubed output buffer? A power amp that should be able to drive even difficult speaker loads? Remote control? You've got them all for $1499. Just add speakers. (I assume you have a laptop computer and several disc spinners.) You may want a separate phono stage, because there is none onboard.

Sam Tellig Posted: Feb 23, 2003 0 comments
Despite its name, the Panache is not made in France, but here in the States, by Portal Audio, headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina. The company is owned and run by Joe Abrams, a longtime veteran of high-end hi-fi who was once closely associated with Threshold.
Kalman Rubinson Sam Tellig Posted: Oct 15, 2002 0 comments
I have a way of grating on people's nerves. Ask Marina, my wife. She calls it my "mean streak."
Sam Tellig Kalman Rubinson Posted: Jun 12, 2009 2 comments
If you have more than six or seven bucks to spend, you might consider the Imagine T floorstanding speaker from PSB Loudspeakers ($2000/pair). A year ago, John Atkinson reviewed PSB's Synchrony One speaker ($4500/pair; Stereophile, April 2008, Vol.31 No.4). The Imagine series is the next line down, and also includes center, surround, and bookshelf models. John Marks flipped over the Imagine B minimonitor in his column in the February 2009 issue.
J. Gordon Holt Sam Tellig Posted: Aug 01, 1995 Published: Aug 01, 1979 0 comments
This is something we don't see too often: an entirely new approach to power amplifier design. As Quad points out in its literature for the 405, class-A operation of transistors provides the lowest distortion, but drastically limits the amount of power an output transistor can deliver without overheating. (Most transistor amps use class-AB output operation, in which each of a pair of power transistors handles part of each signal cycle and shuts down during the other part. Imperfect synchronism between the two halves causes the familiar "crossover distortion," which accounts for most solid-state sound. In class-A operation, each output transistor draws current though the entirety of each signal cycle, eliminating the crossover transition but doubling the amount of time current is drawn, and thus tending to cause the transistor to heat up more.)
Sam Tellig Robert J. Reina Posted: Apr 01, 2007 Published: Apr 01, 1994 0 comments
"Sam, HELP!!!! Wife wants stereo out of the living room, converting spare bedroom for my stuff."
Sam Tellig Various Posted: Jun 30, 1995 Published: Jun 30, 1994 0 comments
"You are not going to believe this."

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