Stereophile Staff

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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 27, 2003 0 comments
In his review of the Clearaudio Champion 2 turntable and Unify tonearm with Benz Micro L2 phono cartridge, Paul Bolin notes, "Turntables are intrinsically cool. Maybe it's that I am of the pre-CD generation, for which the acquisition of one's first really good turntable marked an audiophile's coming of age." Bolin explains why the Clearaudio is a really good player.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Feb 27, 2000 0 comments
How many of you out there know what a Nuvistor is? Michael Fremer takes a look at this unique device and its application in the Musical Fidelity Nu-Vista 300 power amplifier. "Enclosing its vacuum in metal rather than glass, the Nuvistor was designed as a long-lived, highly linear device with low heat, low microphony, and low noise—all of which it needed to have any hope of competing in the brave new solid-state world emerging when RCA introduced it in the 1960s." Musical Fidelity decided to use the Nuvistor in a limited-run amplifier, and therein lies an interesting tale, which Michael skillfully uncovers.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: May 26, 2002 0 comments
Back in 1987, J. Gordon Holt & Martin Colloms set their sights on the Audio Research M300 monoblock power amplifier. "After having proven that vacuum tubes could do some sonic things better than transistors, Audio Research is now endeavoring to show that transistors can do most things better than tubes," says JGH, adding that the then-new M300 is a "hybrid amplifier . . . it's half tube, half solid-state."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Mar 09, 2003 0 comments
Dick Olsher and various other writers take a spin with the Apogee Stage loudspeaker, whose "resemblance to the rest of the Apogee family is unmistakable" in spite of its small size. But the real story is that, "surprisingly, the sound quality does not take a back seat to its more expensive relatives."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Apr 04, 1999 0 comments
Any audiophile who stumbles onto one of the more cantankerous audio newsgroups ("wreck audio opinion," anyone?) may wonder what has happened to the modern breed of audiophiles. One suspects that religious wars pale when compared to how some audio pundits jostle against each other! But over the years, there has always been a wide variety of opinion. For a perspective written decades ago that still holds true today, we present J. Gordon Holt's classic "Why Hi-Fi Experts Disagree."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Oct 18, 2004 0 comments
From the October 2004 issue, John Atkinson reviews the Halcro dm38 power amplifier, noting, "When Halcro's affable US distributor, Philip O'Hanlon, asked me if I would be interested in reviewing the company's first two-channel design, the $18,790 dm38, I didn't need much persuading."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 13, 2003 0 comments
Brian Damkroger ponders the Classé Omega monoblock power amplifier. "The Classé Omega is expensive, costing $25,000/pair," notes BD. But he also finds the amp a "drop-dead-gorgeous, massive, industrial-art chunk of aluminum and steel set off with a subtle mix of curves, contours, finishes, and textures." And then there is that Classé sound.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Nov 21, 1999 0 comments
In his second installment of "Fine Tunes," Jonathan Scull writes: "I met a chap the other day whose wife said to me, 'Oh, you suffer from the same audiophile disease.' I hastened to inform her that I am the disease." But J-10 is also the cure, as he proves in this ode to building the perfect listening room.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Sep 17, 2000 0 comments
Michael Fremer writes, "I've never heard a pair of the Italian Sonus Faber speakers I didn't like. What I've never liked was the US price: too high. And then you have to put them on costly stands." In his review of the floorstanding Sonus Faber Concerto Grand Piano loudspeaker, Fremer grapples with the price/performance ratio of this $3500/pair speaker and answers the important audiophile question: Enough magic for the money?
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Oct 24, 1999 0 comments
Steven Stone writes that "the Signature SC-VI is probably the most 'anti-tweak' flagship high-end speaker ever made." In his very thorough review of the Dunlavy Audio Labs Signature SC-VI loudspeaker, Stone details this legendary audiophile favorite from top to bottom. Is it the perfect speaker? Stone lays down his verdict, and more.

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