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David Gulliver Jan 12, 1998
Based on the replies from an earlier "Vote!" about the future of high-end audio, many audiophiles predict a continually diminishing market for high-end gear.
What would you, as a consumer, suggest the industry do in order to ensure high-end audio's survival?
Price reductions and greater availability of existing equipment
44% (104 votes)
Higher and higher levels of quality, even if the costs go up
6% (13 votes)
Better advertising to reach a broader market, even if it means higher prices
17% (41 votes)
Enter new markets, like computer audio, car audio, and home theater
7% (17 votes)
Nothing---everything's fine!
4% (10 votes)
Other (add comment)
21% (50 votes)
Total votes: 235
Vote
Stereophile Jan 04, 1998
Some claim that FM radio for serious musical enjoyment is dead, while others say it is only sleeping. Certainly some of you have favorite music stations you listen to once in a while. Don't you?
Compared to CDs or vinyl, how often do you listen to music on FM radio?
More than CDs or vinyl
12% (8 votes)
Less than CDs or vinyl
27% (18 votes)
About the same
21% (14 votes)
Only in the car
35% (23 votes)
Never
5% (3 votes)
Total votes: 66
Vote
Dan Rust Jan 04, 1998
Reader Dan Rust decides to rip open the can o' worms about audiophiles spending extra bucks on the wire in their systems. We're curious about your experiences: How important are speaker-cable and interconnect upgrades to you?
Have you found that cable upgrades make a difference in your system?
Yes, big difference
31% (93 votes)
Yes, worthy difference
38% (115 votes)
Yes, subtle difference
18% (54 votes)
No, waste of dough
10% (31 votes)
Haven't upgraded yet
2% (6 votes)
Total votes: 299
Vote
Barry Willis Dec 22, 1997
Recording and music production technology has seen enormous change in recent years. Engineers and producers now have unprecedented power to manipulate the tinest details in recordings using computers and other tools. But the process may be taking the life and soul out of music. Some feel that commercial recordings lack the spontaneity that makes live music so immediate and satisfying. Others prefer the "perfection."
Changes in recording technology have made music:
Much better
27% (29 votes)
Slightly better
27% (29 votes)
No change
8% (9 votes)
A little worse
22% (24 votes)
Much worse
16% (17 votes)
Total votes: 108
Vote
Gary Ang & Ster... Dec 14, 1997
In the January '98 Stereophile, Michael Zeugin of Audio Influx asserts that high-end audio is being sucked into a "Black Hole" for a variety of reasons. These include: goofy products, computers taking over the youth market, and boomers' limited income being channeled elsewhere. What do you think?
Will the market for high-end audio get better or worse?
He's nuts---it'll get better
29% (56 votes)
Worse: limited income
8% (16 votes)
Worse: goofy products
5% (10 votes)
Worse: computers
13% (24 votes)
Worse: all of the above
21% (40 votes)
Worse: other (add comment)
24% (46 votes)
Total votes: 192
Vote
Stereophile Staff Dec 07, 1997
Bits vs atoms! The new frontier of audio distribution is said to include downloading recordings over the internet onto a CD or DVD recorder for a modest fee. We'll assume for the moment that bandwidth has improved to the point where this is not a painful process, and data compression is not needed. But the question remains: Are you a collector who wants the original disc, or do you just want the music fast and cheap?
Which would you prefer: purchasing hard copies of new recordings, or paying for a download onto your CD or DVD recorder?
Purchase the actual disc
76% (210 votes)
Download and record
6% (17 votes)
Depends on the music/artist
6% (18 votes)
Depends on the cost to download
12% (33 votes)
Total votes: 278
Vote
Stereophile Nov 30, 1997
DVD audio standards are still up in the air, but promise (hopefully) to come down soon. For our inaugural question, we want to know what you prefer: fewer channels and longer playing times, or multichannel high-quality sound with shorter playing times.
How many channels and what formats do you want to see on DVD Audio discs?
2 channels: 16bit/44kHz
2% (8 votes)
2 channels: 24bit/96kHz
40% (204 votes)
5.1channels: 16bit/44kHz
1% (5 votes)
5.1 channels: 24bit/96kHz
26% (133 votes)
5.1 channels: Dolby Digital (AC-3)
7% (35 votes)
5.1 channels: DTS
6% (31 votes)
Mix of Formats
11% (58 votes)
Open Standards
6% (31 votes)
Don't Care
1% (6 votes)
Total votes: 511
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