Wes Phillips

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Wes Phillips Posted: Jun 26, 2006 0 comments
Answer: You have to "attend" to an object for it to actually register. Jeff Wong sends along a couple of links on "change blindness." Click on the external link for the article and then click here for the examples.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Mar 14, 2007 0 comments
According to Ephraim Lytle, far too much. I haven't seen the movie, but I have to admit I'm disturbed at the shoddy treatment of Demophilus' 700 Thespians, who heroically refused to withdraw with the rest of the Greek forces, and died with the Spartans.
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Wes Phillips Posted: May 02, 2006 3 comments
People like Samir Husni are teaching it in J-school (U Mississippi): "[Rolling Stone] is one of the few magazines that stayed true to its original mission and audience from the beginning. Wenner was able to maintain the original flavor and keep the passengers on board while bringing in new ones. RS is unique. There is nothing like it on the same scale." Except for all of those other magazines with unclad celebrities on the cover.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Jan 06, 2006 0 comments
John LaGrou sent me this link to a thought provoking collection of essays.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Apr 11, 2006 0 comments
"You've taken on a design challenge and come up with a solution that's been widely admired and won you accolades. But a year or so later, you realize you made a mistake. There's something horribly wrong with your design. And it's not just something cosmetic — a badly resolved corner, some misspaced type — but a fundamental flaw that will almost certainly lead to catastrophic failure. And that failure will result not just in embarassment, or professional ruin, but death, the death of thousands of people.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Apr 11, 2006 2 comments
"You've taken on a design challenge and come up with a solution that's been widely admired and won you accolades. But a year or so later, you realize you made a mistake. There's something horribly wrong with your design. And it's not just something cosmetic — a badly resolved corner, some misspaced type — but a fundamental flaw that will almost certainly lead to catastrophic failure. And that failure will result not just in embarassment, or professional ruin, but death, the death of thousands of people.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Feb 08, 2006 6 comments
A Dartmouth study suggests the brain doesn't stop developing at 18. Of course, women have been saying that about guys for years. Now there's proof.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 27, 2006 1 comments
Waaay before it becomes audiophilia. A documentary about the Audiophile Club of Athens.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Jun 11, 2007 0 comments
Keith "tha missile" Bailey played bass for Gong, many years ago. After that, for his sins, he served as Gong's booking agent. He tells the tale of what happened one night in Hamburg when famed drummer Pierre Moerlen went AWOL, Daevid Allen went into a wizardly rage, and Bailey went on as the band's drummer.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 06, 2006 1 comments
David Halberstam remembers an era when the press wasn't the administration's lapdog. What a great piece of writing.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Jan 22, 2008 3 comments
Who knows? This might be good.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Sep 25, 2006 0 comments
Bill Thompson explains how DRM supersedes copyright law and chills creativity.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Apr 11, 2006 2 comments
I saw this article about a counterfeit antique coin last week and didn't give it a second thought. So what? I muttered. It just shows scammers were ever with us.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Aug 10, 2006 5 comments
The Morning News' Clay Risen thinks the LA Times shouldn't have published Claire Hoffman's story on Girls Gone Wild sleazeball Joe Francis. Risen thinks Hoffman couldn't write objectively about a man who assaulted her.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Feb 09, 2006 0 comments
Now there's proof. Besides Congress, I mean.

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