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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jun 30, 2002 0 comments
Earlier this year, Kalman Rubinson spent some time with the Rotel RB 1080 power amplifier. "What could be easier to review than a power amplifier? No features or functions aside from inputs, outputs, and a power switch," remarks KR. But as Rubinson finds, it's the details that count.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jun 13, 1999 0 comments
Writer Robert Deutsch takes an in-depth look at the Hales Design Group Revelation Three loudspeaker in an attempt to determine whether the product lives up to its name. He also checks into the manufacturer's claim that "what we made will forever change the world of dynamic loudspeakers . . . an instant classic, a benchmark against which others of its type are measured."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jun 06, 1999 0 comments
Conrad-Johnson has been on a roll with their Anniversary Reference Triode preamplifier, aka the ART, which garnered the Stereophile Product of the Year award in 1998. (See previous article.) According to Lew Johnson, "We realized that Conrad-Johnson is coming up on its 20th anniversary, so we thought we might produce something special to celebrate. This is a version of the preamplifier we use in our listening room at the factory---we never even thought about producing it because it would be god-awful expensive. But it really is our last thought on what a preamp should be, so we figured we'd produce a limited edition, say 250 total, as a way of commemorating our 20 years in the business."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Apr 30, 2000 0 comments
Jonathan Scull thinks he has uncoverd the hot audiophile topic for the new millennium—e-commerce. He lays out the situation in "Fine Tunes" #19. Find out what various manufacturers are up to, and why.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 29, 2001 0 comments
Larry Greenhill says he'll never forget his first encounter with the Krell LAT-1 loudspeaker at a meeting of the Westchester Audiophile Society. Suitably impressed, Greenhill reports, "I'd been bitten. I made arrangements to continue the audition in my own listening room." His complete analysis awaits.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Oct 17, 1999 0 comments
Madrigal Audio Labs designed the original Mark Levinson No.30 nearly 10 years ago with the idea that, as a Reference Series product, it would never be made obsolete. John Atkinson reviews the No.30's latest upgrade, the Mark Levinson No.30.6 Reference D/A processor, after sending his personal unit from 1992 back to the factory for the required work. What he got back included new D/A converters in the unit's twin towers. Was it worth the effort, and does this processor still define the state of the art? You'll want to read his report to find out.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: May 24, 2004 0 comments
"Size does matter," John Atkinson discovers, as he fits the Shure E3c in-ear headphones into his ears. Once fitted, JA hooks the mini "cans" up to his iPod and PowerBook to discover how much audiophile sound a little set of ear buds can produce.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jan 12, 2004 0 comments
Sam Tellig and Lonnie Brownell both provide trenchant analyses of the Bryston B-60R integrated amplifier. Tellig notes, "With Bryston gear, you get solid engineering and impeccable—I was going to say unimpeachable—build quality. This is what you pay for; not bulletproof faceplates, gold-plated name badges, or the like."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Aug 19, 2001 0 comments
From the August 2001 issue, we have Michael Fremer's illuminating review of the Audio Physic Avanti III loudspeaker. Fremer wonders how Audio Physic can top the outstanding price/performance success of its middle-of-the line Virgo model with a speaker that costs twice as much. As Fremer asks, "Is the Avanti twice as good as the Virgo? More than twice as good? Or is it just another competent but undistinguished design?"
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Mar 30, 2003 0 comments
Corey Greenberg channels his heroes Beavis and Butthead to review the NHT SuperZero loudspeaker and SW2 subwoofer. As CG explains, the NHT may be the first speaker "that really kicks ass—one that offers true high-end, full-range sound, all for under $1000." Huh-huh, huh-huh.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jan 05, 2004 0 comments
As Paul Messenger states in his 2000 review of the Linn Arkiv B phono cartridge, "This Stereophile review is long overdue. Furthermore, this review addresses a complaint often directed against reviews and reviewers: that we rarely spend enough time with a component to gain a properly balanced, long-term perspective."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jan 12, 2003 0 comments
Robert Deutsch tackles the Balanced Audio Technology VK-40 preamplifier, noting "Few topics will get audiophiles into an argument more readily than a discussion of the relative merits of tubed and solid-state equipment."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Mar 18, 2001 0 comments
Tweaks can rear their pointy little heads in the most unexpected of places, as Stereophile's inimitable Jonathan Scull discovered recently when he stubbed his toe. In Fine Tunes #33, J-10 reveals the floor screw tweak and many more.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 22, 2001 0 comments
While doing research for his analysis of the Totem Acoustic Forest loudspeaker, Larry Greenhill uncovered a legacy of great reviews for the company's previous products each ending with a final "but . . ." comment. But . . . does Greenhill discover any killer "buts" with the Forest? He explains in detail.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Mar 19, 2000 0 comments
Regardless of what the skeptics claim, Jonathan Scull is a firm believer in resonance-control devices. For "Fine Tunes" #15, Scull investigates some products he has found useful. "Pssst," Scull whispers. "Hey you. Yeah, you . . . we know you're a tweaker. It's nothing to be ashamed of. You just wanna make it better, right? Even as everyone around you wants to know when enough's enough already."

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