News

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Apr 07, 2002 0 comments
Back in September of 1986, the KEF R107 loudspeaker represented the flagship of KEF's much admired Reference Series. Dick Olsher and a variety of other Stereophile scribes profile this important audio achievement over the course of five years, wrapping up with Tom Norton's 1995 review of the R107/2 "Raymond Cooke Signature Edition."
Filed under
Jon Iverson Posted: Sep 05, 1999 0 comments
Want to start an audio newsgroup fire-fight? Just put the three letters "ABX" in the subject line of your post, sit back, and watch the pros take over. Read where it all started 15 years ago in "The Highs & Lows of Double-Blind Testing," which John Atkinson has compiled from the years 1985 and 1986, when an argumentative thread ran through Stereophile's pages discussing the benefits (or lack of) of double-blind testing methods in audio component reviewing—all triggered by J. Gordon Holt's review of the ABX Comparator.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Feb 10, 2002 0 comments
Chip Stern writes in his review of the Blue Circle BC3 Galatea line-level preamplifier, "From the moment I hooked these units up, the captivating turquoise glow of their matching front-panel lights (a glowing orb within a blue circle) held out the promise of something inviting and serene." Promise fulfilled? Stern spills the Blue Circle beans.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Aug 16, 2004 0 comments
Paul Bolin notes, "Bankers and doctors bought McIntosh, not 'serious' audiophiles. So ran the conventional wisdom." While reviewing the McIntosh MC501 monoblock power amplifier, PB discovers that conventional wisdom can be anything but wise.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Nov 14, 1999 0 comments
One of the more popular monthly columns in Stereophile these days is Jonathan Scull's "Fine Tunes." To keep our online readers fit and tweaked, we are going to be adding Scull's columns to the online Archives section on a weekly basis, starting with the first column he wrote for the magazine, back in July 1998: "Fine Tunes #1." "I think I just got 2000 bucks' worth of difference," writes a reader about the value of the advice contained in J-10's first installment.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Jun 21, 2004 0 comments
In his review of the Velodyne Digital Drive DD-18 powered subwoofer, Larry Greenhill comments, "When I've tested other 'breakthrough' subwoofers, I've been disappointed. All the convenient fine-tuning in the world won't matter if I end up with the same nasty old room modes and woofer bloat." But as LG discovers, the DD-18 is indeed different.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Nov 17, 2003 0 comments
John Atkinson gets his mitts on the PSB Platinum T8 loudspeaker and remarks that "talented loudspeaker engineers do not stand still, and neither do the resources and technology available to them." Does PSB's new flagship design live up to JA's expectations? All is revealed.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Jun 28, 2004 0 comments
Brian Damkroger listens long and hard to the Primare D30.2 CD player noting, "Primare is reluctant to provide much technical detail about their designs, preferring to let their products do the talking." So after a little chatting, BD files his report.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Jun 04, 2000 0 comments
With multichannel DVD-Audio just around the corner, the surround-sound debate among audiophiles is starting anew. But how far have we come with surround sound in 30 years? J. Gordon Holt wrote "Bye Bye, Quadrifi?" back in 1971, in which he explored the same dilemmas faced by today's audiophile.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments
As John Atkinson puts it, Meridian usually does things "their way," putting amps and DACs inside of speakers in an all-out attempt at "re-creating the original soundfield, no matter how many speakers and channels it takes to do it right." But as Atkinson finds, the Meridian 518 Digital Audio Processor might be the company's most perverse product: "The $1650 518 offers digital inputs and outputs only. It can digitally perform gain and source selection; it can change data with one digital word length to data with another; and it does all these things with 72-bit internal precision." So JA asks, "How does the 518 fit within a conventional high-end audio system?" Read along as he figures it all out.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Apr 27, 2003 0 comments
Digital jitter was a lively topic in the mid-'90s, and the Genesis Technologies Digital Lens was created to tame it. Robert Harley reviews the product and explains why the Lens became an essential part of his system at the time. JA adds comments.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Dec 17, 2000 0 comments
Record 10 CDs worth of music in one weekend? John Atkinson writes: "I blanched. This was an enormous task: 32 sonatas; 103 individual movements; more than 11 hours of music—11 hours, 26 minutes, and 25 seconds, as it turned out." How to record Canadian pianist Robert Silverman performing Ludwig van Beethoven's 32 Piano Sonatas in such a short time? JA explains the revolutionary process in detail.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Sep 15, 2002 0 comments
In his recent review of the Thiel CS1.6 loudspeaker, John Atkinson pointed out that while expensive speakers "do indeed provide great sound for the tens of thousands of dollars they demand from their owners, they are out of reach of the majority of audiophiles." Ever the populist, JA tackles this reasonably priced Thiel to see how it measures up to the big boys.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 27, 2003 0 comments
In his review of the Clearaudio Champion 2 turntable and Unify tonearm with Benz Micro L2 phono cartridge, Paul Bolin notes, "Turntables are intrinsically cool. Maybe it's that I am of the pre-CD generation, for which the acquisition of one's first really good turntable marked an audiophile's coming of age." Bolin explains why the Clearaudio is a really good player.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Mar 22, 2004 0 comments
From the March 2004 issue, Michael Fremer goes a couple rounds with the Theta Digital Enterprise monoblock power amplifier, exclaiming, "Monoblock power amplifiers seem to be moving in and out of my listening room faster than green-onion salsa from Chi-Chi's." So how does the Theta stand up to the competition? MF lays it out.

Pages

X