The Tight Lines Project The Music

Fri, 04/14/2017

COMMENTS
jimtavegia's picture

Your prices are a bargain, by the way. Thanks for that.

jimtavegia's picture

AD has written a great piece on this excellent score and performance, so I will not try and add to that. What I would ask you to do do not listen to this music the first couple of times as background music. Take some personal time and let this music and performance take you someplace, as it did me.

The Key here for me is Mr. Matson's scoring experience which is in full bloom here. Have a seat in your favorite listening chair with your favorite beverage and let the music transport you somewhere in your mind's eye. It will.

Some of the tracks will have abrupt time changes that will quickly take you from one place to another if you let it. Each of the three days that I spent listening to the entire CD my mind took me somewhere else, some affected by my day's events and others just because I allowed it to remind of some other place and time.

I often thought how some of the tracks would have fit right into two of my favorite movies: The King's Speech and The Book Thief; not that there was anything wrong with either of the musical scores of those movies, as there is not and I enjoy them, but it does prove to me that there might not be a definitive score of any movie...that another composer might have a slightly different take that would work just as well.

I am not going to point out any particular tracks as I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but enjoy coming to your own conclusions as to what images can be conjured up by each listener as they enjoy this great music recorded especially well.

I think that this is one of the best sounding CDs in my collection. I am just not one of those folks who is down on digital. I will buy the 2496 version when the download is available and what I expect is what I hear in my consumer grade home studio...2496 sounds great and analog like to me. I do find 24192 even better, but it is marginally so and often very hard to discern the improvement to my nearly 70 year old ears. I can easily hear the improvement in 2496 over redbook in terms of space around the instruments and a smoothness that is unmistakable. I look forward to it.

I also have to say that this CD has to be one of the bargains of the year and every Stereophile subscriber needs this if for nothing else than an academic exercise, but you will find it is much more than that and you will listen to it many times over.

Enjoy the score to the movie that your mind's eye will take you. Great fun.

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The Tight Lines Project The Composer

Fri, 04/14/2017

COMMENTS
jimtavegia's picture

Your prices are a bargain, by the way. Thanks for that.

jimtavegia's picture

AD has written a great piece on this excellent score and performance, so I will not try and add to that. What I would ask you to do do not listen to this music the first couple of times as background music. Take some personal time and let this music and performance take you someplace, as it did me.

The Key here for me is Mr. Matson's scoring experience which is in full bloom here. Have a seat in your favorite listening chair with your favorite beverage and let the music transport you somewhere in your mind's eye. It will.

Some of the tracks will have abrupt time changes that will quickly take you from one place to another if you let it. Each of the three days that I spent listening to the entire CD my mind took me somewhere else, some affected by my day's events and others just because I allowed it to remind of some other place and time.

I often thought how some of the tracks would have fit right into two of my favorite movies: The King's Speech and The Book Thief; not that there was anything wrong with either of the musical scores of those movies, as there is not and I enjoy them, but it does prove to me that there might not be a definitive score of any movie...that another composer might have a slightly different take that would work just as well.

I am not going to point out any particular tracks as I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but enjoy coming to your own conclusions as to what images can be conjured up by each listener as they enjoy this great music recorded especially well.

I think that this is one of the best sounding CDs in my collection. I am just not one of those folks who is down on digital. I will buy the 2496 version when the download is available and what I expect is what I hear in my consumer grade home studio...2496 sounds great and analog like to me. I do find 24192 even better, but it is marginally so and often very hard to discern the improvement to my nearly 70 year old ears. I can easily hear the improvement in 2496 over redbook in terms of space around the instruments and a smoothness that is unmistakable. I look forward to it.

I also have to say that this CD has to be one of the bargains of the year and every Stereophile subscriber needs this if for nothing else than an academic exercise, but you will find it is much more than that and you will listen to it many times over.

Enjoy the score to the movie that your mind's eye will take you. Great fun.

Pages

The Tight Lines Project The Cast

Fri, 04/14/2017

COMMENTS
jimtavegia's picture

Your prices are a bargain, by the way. Thanks for that.

jimtavegia's picture

AD has written a great piece on this excellent score and performance, so I will not try and add to that. What I would ask you to do do not listen to this music the first couple of times as background music. Take some personal time and let this music and performance take you someplace, as it did me.

The Key here for me is Mr. Matson's scoring experience which is in full bloom here. Have a seat in your favorite listening chair with your favorite beverage and let the music transport you somewhere in your mind's eye. It will.

Some of the tracks will have abrupt time changes that will quickly take you from one place to another if you let it. Each of the three days that I spent listening to the entire CD my mind took me somewhere else, some affected by my day's events and others just because I allowed it to remind of some other place and time.

I often thought how some of the tracks would have fit right into two of my favorite movies: The King's Speech and The Book Thief; not that there was anything wrong with either of the musical scores of those movies, as there is not and I enjoy them, but it does prove to me that there might not be a definitive score of any movie...that another composer might have a slightly different take that would work just as well.

I am not going to point out any particular tracks as I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but enjoy coming to your own conclusions as to what images can be conjured up by each listener as they enjoy this great music recorded especially well.

I think that this is one of the best sounding CDs in my collection. I am just not one of those folks who is down on digital. I will buy the 2496 version when the download is available and what I expect is what I hear in my consumer grade home studio...2496 sounds great and analog like to me. I do find 24192 even better, but it is marginally so and often very hard to discern the improvement to my nearly 70 year old ears. I can easily hear the improvement in 2496 over redbook in terms of space around the instruments and a smoothness that is unmistakable. I look forward to it.

I also have to say that this CD has to be one of the bargains of the year and every Stereophile subscriber needs this if for nothing else than an academic exercise, but you will find it is much more than that and you will listen to it many times over.

Enjoy the score to the movie that your mind's eye will take you. Great fun.

Pages

The Tight Lines Project Page 2

Fri, 04/14/2017

COMMENTS
jimtavegia's picture

Your prices are a bargain, by the way. Thanks for that.

jimtavegia's picture

AD has written a great piece on this excellent score and performance, so I will not try and add to that. What I would ask you to do do not listen to this music the first couple of times as background music. Take some personal time and let this music and performance take you someplace, as it did me.

The Key here for me is Mr. Matson's scoring experience which is in full bloom here. Have a seat in your favorite listening chair with your favorite beverage and let the music transport you somewhere in your mind's eye. It will.

Some of the tracks will have abrupt time changes that will quickly take you from one place to another if you let it. Each of the three days that I spent listening to the entire CD my mind took me somewhere else, some affected by my day's events and others just because I allowed it to remind of some other place and time.

I often thought how some of the tracks would have fit right into two of my favorite movies: The King's Speech and The Book Thief; not that there was anything wrong with either of the musical scores of those movies, as there is not and I enjoy them, but it does prove to me that there might not be a definitive score of any movie...that another composer might have a slightly different take that would work just as well.

I am not going to point out any particular tracks as I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but enjoy coming to your own conclusions as to what images can be conjured up by each listener as they enjoy this great music recorded especially well.

I think that this is one of the best sounding CDs in my collection. I am just not one of those folks who is down on digital. I will buy the 2496 version when the download is available and what I expect is what I hear in my consumer grade home studio...2496 sounds great and analog like to me. I do find 24192 even better, but it is marginally so and often very hard to discern the improvement to my nearly 70 year old ears. I can easily hear the improvement in 2496 over redbook in terms of space around the instruments and a smoothness that is unmistakable. I look forward to it.

I also have to say that this CD has to be one of the bargains of the year and every Stereophile subscriber needs this if for nothing else than an academic exercise, but you will find it is much more than that and you will listen to it many times over.

Enjoy the score to the movie that your mind's eye will take you. Great fun.

Pages

The Tight Lines Project

It has been six years since we last released a recording on the Stereophile label—a jazz album featuring Attention Screen, the late Bob Reina's free-jazz ensemble. This dry spell was mainly due to the increasing demands made on our editorial team's time by social media and the magazine's website, but also by John Atkinson's recording activities with the Portland State Chamber Choir, who issue their recordings on their own label. Nevertheless, we've been keeping our eyes and ears open for suitable opportunities.
Fri, 04/14/2017

Now is the Month of Maying...

...goes the song from the Middle Ages and no, it isn't really true in the month of Apriling. But the May issue of Stereophile is about to hit newsstands, mailboxes, and tables as we write and it is, we modestly claim, one heck of an issue!
Fri, 04/14/2017

Dynaco A-25 loudspeaker Specifications

Thu, 04/13/2017

COMMENTS
es347's picture

..I was fortunate to have hears a pr of these little guys back in 1969 actually and must agree with Mr Holt...they were pretty remarkable especially give the msrp..

Mikeymort's picture

I have a pair I've used for years. They still sound great..in fact better than when I bought them as I've upgraded all of my associated equipment. The mid range is still smoother than anything else I've heard.

Herb Reichert's picture

and still a benchmark for ease and naturalness (in my mind). Nice article by Mr. Holt !

monetschemist's picture

... yesterday I was dreaming about building speakers and I spotted these modern implementations of Dynaco A25s:

http://www.seas.no/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=475:seas...

markotto's picture

"Don't tell your status-conscious friends how much they cost.They don't sound quite as good when you know."" I think a lot of audio manufacturers have made a very tidy profit based on that idea.

Pages

Dynaco A-25 loudspeaker

Everyone knows that a lot of serious music listeners—that is, those who listen to music instead of using it as a conversational background—have neither the space nor the money for a pair of typical floor-standing speakers, and must make do with bookshelf-type systems that are actually small enough to put in a bookshelf. But while the typical audio perfectionist will freely admit that there is a place in the audio sun for these dinky little speakers, he cannot really take them seriously, particularly when they're priced significantly under $100 each.
Mon, 12/01/1969

Crown DC-300 power amplifier

If we had been asked some time ago to describe our "dream amplifier," chances are we would have described the Crown DC-300. Designed originally as an industrial device, it was made available as an audio amplifier rather as an afterthought. But if that roundabout approach is necessary to produce an audio amplifier like this, so be it.
Mon, 06/01/1970

Crown DC-300 power amplifier Specifications

Wed, 04/12/2017

COMMENTS
tonykaz's picture

Dear Mr.JA,

The latest version of this Amp costs only $350. Could you convince our lovely Whistler in Port Townsend to give it a quick review?, he owns a pair of Speakers that might just give this thing a run for its money.

I know that Tyll had a day or two at Harmon with their Big M2 set-up that uses these Crowns.

A review like this could be a real Eye-opener!

Of course, reviewing a Crown using Wilsons would be a brave thing to do considering it's an "Industrial" type of device with Zero Audiophile Creds. Betcha Harmon would jump at the chance. ( I certainly would ).

Besides, where else can we subscribers find "interesting and useful" journalism?, who else would dare.

All the Best,

Tony in Michigan

John Werner's picture

Boy how times have changed. It's nothing today to pick up a copy of Stereophile from the past decade and read about stereo and mono block amps in excess of $50,000. Even when adjusted for an arbitrary 15X price differential this review seems to hint at a kind of high value even as it apologizes that most folks can't afford it at the time. I think it snaps into focus how high-end audio has become, often, quite out of reach price-wise. When I read about amps in excess of 50K I wonder who, and how many who's, actually buy this stuff. I think that even in 1970 when a fine car sold for just under 5K this amp may have been something to aspire to that was actually reachable. I get tired of reading about so much gear in today's Stereophile that while interesting is totally irrelevant due to expense. That said I've enjoyed revisited this vintage review more than quite a few I've grown used to reading over the past decade in Stereophile. Here' wishing we get more great vintage reviews that warrant our attention along side of new reviews we can realistically aspire to not just reading about, but to actually owning.

dalethorn's picture

$700 then, and $4400 in today's money. For me, an average earner who would entertain about $2000 to $2500 for speakers, $4400 is a lot for just a power amp. Never mind the $15000 and up amps today, with the great cost reductions (adjusted for inflation) we've seen due to progress in electronics since 1970, you should be able to get a better power amp for less than $4000. So where are we at, after all?

mrkaic's picture

Benchmark AHB2 is in my view the best power amplifier currently available and costs $3000 (you can read the review in this magazine and judge it for yourself). This is still a lot of money, but in line with the price of the Crown (plus the downward adjustment for progress in electronics).

For much less money you can get a NAD amplifier. They make superb products and I am quite sure that so called audiophiles would not be able to hear the difference between a NAD and a boutique (snobbish) amplifier costing $15k or more.

So, that is progress, is it not?

dalethorn's picture

That all sounds great to me, although I've had a couple of NAD's and I wasn't too fond of their reliability in heavy use.

mrkaic's picture

Behringer A500 is dirt cheap and a great performer:

http://matrixhifi.com/ENG_contenedor_ppec.htm

jmsent's picture

wasn't very good, even in its day. It used rugged, but slow output devices and huge amounts of negative feedback. It's claim to fame was stable power, power, and more power. It certainly had "authority" in the bass. But like most large solid state amps of the day sounded dry and hard in the top end. There was very little out there in the day that could drive the likes of a Dayton Wright, B & W DM70, or even a Dahlquist DQ 10. The best you could get from tubes (within the realm of sanity) was about 75 watts a channel. Not enough for those "super speakers". It's successor, the DC300A wasn't much better. The store I worked for sold Crown, but nobody that worked there would own it. The accompanying IC150 preamp was equally horrible. I stuck with tubes until the Sony and Yamaha V-fet stuff came along a couple years later. Now, that WAS good sounding solid state gear...finally.

dalethorn's picture

Rugged was the key word for Crown. Ads for their tape decks said "...able to survive a parachute drop" etc. And while Crown electronics didn't sound nearly as good as decent tube electronics, there were worse solid state items on the market than Crown back then.

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