California Audio Show 2015: Day 2 Continued

I wish I could tell you about the Linn system in this room, but both times I tried to enter, Steven Lester was in the middle of a long rap. Lester's video components always provide some of the most fun and unexpected treats at a show, and usually result in packed rooms. That was certainly the case the first time I came by.
Mon, 08/17/2015

California Audio Show 2015: Second Day Rounds

Mexico's most distinguished audio manufacturer, Margules Audio, demmed a system at CAS6 headlined by the Margules U280-SC 25th-Anniversary, stereo tube amplifier ($5399). The midrange was warm and wonderful—just what the doctor ordered, in fact. Despite a little brightness on top, and a bit of shallowness on bottom, the set-up was supremely musical and capable of conveying joyful, delicate beauty with panache. That, my friends, means a whole lot in my book.
Mon, 08/17/2015

Hot Contenders at the 2015 CAS

"Do you two have a bodyguard?" I asked Elac speaker designer Andrew Jones (right) and equally legendary Audio Alchemy electronics designer Peter Madnick (left) upon hearing the tremendous sound pouring forth from their bargain system ($5500 including custom-made music server and cabling). "If you don't, you'd be wise to consider hiring one. Given the virtually illegal amount of warmth, bass, and full-range sound you're getting from those tiny little speakers and that sub, I wouldn't be surprised if at least one high-priced manufacturer is tempted to do you in, lest you give the lie to the assertion that higher prices equate with better sound."
Sun, 08/16/2015

California Audio Show 2015: Day One Continued

One of the highlights of Day One at CAS was the room put together by Bricasti. The opening track in Brian Zolner of Bricasti's sensational salvo may have been drawn from, God help us, the soundtrack to Alien 3, but the midrange was gorgeous, and the dynamic range immense. Simply immense. This Bricasti and friends system exhibited the largest dynamic range sweeps of any system I recall hearing in a standard-size hotel room.
Sat, 08/15/2015

California Audio Show 2015: Day One

On paper, the 6th annual California Audio Show, taking place this weekend at the Westin SFO in Millbrae, CA just south of San Francisco, qualifies as the smallest consumer audio show in the United States. But you wouldn't have known it from the lines at the registration table at 10:30am on opening day. The place looked packed. And the reality was, given 29 active exhibit rooms, some with multiple systems, plus other active exhibits in the lobby, Friday's turnout felt perfect.
Sat, 08/15/2015

Miles Davis at Newport, 1955–1975

News of yet another boxed-set of previously unissued Miles recordings never fails to zap the juices of anticipatory pleasure—and Sony's vaults, in particular, hold a lot of them. The latest, The Bootleg Series, Vol. 4: Miles Davis at Newport, 1955–1975 (Columbia Legacy), contains four CDs chronicling eight sessions from his appearances at the Newport Jazz Festival.
Fri, 08/14/2015

Adcom GDA-700 D/A processor Specifications

Fri, 08/14/2015

COMMENTS
tonykaz's picture

Ok, its an Adcom.

Bob Katz just revealed ( in his Innerfidelity Article ) how DACs are becoming "transparent".

His most recent DAC is even more transparent that his previous DAC, which he seemed to think of as perfectly transparent.

However, it seems to require a superb STAX headphone system ( acting as an Audio Microscope ) for even professional Sound people to hear these differences.

The important word of wisdom here: "transparent".

So, that's the quality we should be considering in DACs : they should be "clear windows".

Of course a person would need to know what the music "should" sound like. How is anyone supposed to be able to know this??

Tony in Michigan

Dakmart's picture

... Isn't HDCD actually owned by Microsoft these days?

John Atkinson's picture
Dakmart wrote:
Isn't HDCD actually owned by Microsoft these days?

Yes it is, since 2000, but they don't appear to have done anything substantive with it. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Definition_Compatible_Digital.

John Atkinson
Editor, Stereophile

JRT's picture

This article about the old Adcom GDA-700 mentioned that it used Pacific Microsonics' PMD100. That PMD100 was a flawed design that audibly colored the sound. The design flaws were later corrected in the PMD200.

The PMD200 was Pacific Microsonics code running on an off the shelf DSP, and was not backward compatible with the flawed PMD100 which was a device specially manufactured for Pacific Microsonics.

Regardless any of that, for better HDCD playback than you will get from a device using the PMD100, dBpoweramp can be used to transcode HDCD data to 24_bit, 44.1_ksps PCM digital audio, and can convert that to suitable FLAC. You can play that back from a variety of devices and software through a modern DA converter without need for the now obsolete Pacific Microsonics DSP.

Pages

Adcom GDA-700 D/A processor Measurements

Fri, 08/14/2015

COMMENTS
tonykaz's picture

Ok, its an Adcom.

Bob Katz just revealed ( in his Innerfidelity Article ) how DACs are becoming "transparent".

His most recent DAC is even more transparent that his previous DAC, which he seemed to think of as perfectly transparent.

However, it seems to require a superb STAX headphone system ( acting as an Audio Microscope ) for even professional Sound people to hear these differences.

The important word of wisdom here: "transparent".

So, that's the quality we should be considering in DACs : they should be "clear windows".

Of course a person would need to know what the music "should" sound like. How is anyone supposed to be able to know this??

Tony in Michigan

Dakmart's picture

... Isn't HDCD actually owned by Microsoft these days?

John Atkinson's picture
Dakmart wrote:
Isn't HDCD actually owned by Microsoft these days?

Yes it is, since 2000, but they don't appear to have done anything substantive with it. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Definition_Compatible_Digital.

John Atkinson
Editor, Stereophile

JRT's picture

This article about the old Adcom GDA-700 mentioned that it used Pacific Microsonics' PMD100. That PMD100 was a flawed design that audibly colored the sound. The design flaws were later corrected in the PMD200.

The PMD200 was Pacific Microsonics code running on an off the shelf DSP, and was not backward compatible with the flawed PMD100 which was a device specially manufactured for Pacific Microsonics.

Regardless any of that, for better HDCD playback than you will get from a device using the PMD100, dBpoweramp can be used to transcode HDCD data to 24_bit, 44.1_ksps PCM digital audio, and can convert that to suitable FLAC. You can play that back from a variety of devices and software through a modern DA converter without need for the now obsolete Pacific Microsonics DSP.

Pages

Audio-Technica AT-OC9 phono cartridge Measurements

Fri, 08/14/2015

Adcom GDA-700 D/A processor System

Fri, 08/14/2015

COMMENTS
tonykaz's picture

Ok, its an Adcom.

Bob Katz just revealed ( in his Innerfidelity Article ) how DACs are becoming "transparent".

His most recent DAC is even more transparent that his previous DAC, which he seemed to think of as perfectly transparent.

However, it seems to require a superb STAX headphone system ( acting as an Audio Microscope ) for even professional Sound people to hear these differences.

The important word of wisdom here: "transparent".

So, that's the quality we should be considering in DACs : they should be "clear windows".

Of course a person would need to know what the music "should" sound like. How is anyone supposed to be able to know this??

Tony in Michigan

Dakmart's picture

... Isn't HDCD actually owned by Microsoft these days?

John Atkinson's picture
Dakmart wrote:
Isn't HDCD actually owned by Microsoft these days?

Yes it is, since 2000, but they don't appear to have done anything substantive with it. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Definition_Compatible_Digital.

John Atkinson
Editor, Stereophile

JRT's picture

This article about the old Adcom GDA-700 mentioned that it used Pacific Microsonics' PMD100. That PMD100 was a flawed design that audibly colored the sound. The design flaws were later corrected in the PMD200.

The PMD200 was Pacific Microsonics code running on an off the shelf DSP, and was not backward compatible with the flawed PMD100 which was a device specially manufactured for Pacific Microsonics.

Regardless any of that, for better HDCD playback than you will get from a device using the PMD100, dBpoweramp can be used to transcode HDCD data to 24_bit, 44.1_ksps PCM digital audio, and can convert that to suitable FLAC. You can play that back from a variety of devices and software through a modern DA converter without need for the now obsolete Pacific Microsonics DSP.

Pages

Pages

X
Enter your Stereophile.com username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading