Thöress 300B monoblock power amplifier Associated Equipment

Fri, 04/03/2015
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Thöress 300B monoblock power amplifier Specifications

Fri, 04/03/2015
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Thöress 300B monoblock power amplifier Page 2

Fri, 04/03/2015
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The Fifth Element #90 Contacts

Fri, 04/03/2015
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Bansaku's picture

Back in the day audiophiles used to throw up carpet or curtains on the wall behind the speakers. Cheap, sometimes ugly, but effective. :P

Just the facts's picture

Imagine the purity when you eliminate all effects and save money by just taking your speakers outside. Only pesky ground reflections. Sitting atop a tall pole and pointing your speakers up solves that.

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Thöress 300B monoblock power amplifier

I was weak and easily led.

In 1978, after enduring four or five years of wretched music made by men with long hair and beards and tendencies toward eonic guitar solos, I suddenly discovered that the only music worth hearing was made by clean-shaven men of limited musical proficiency. I embraced the Clash, the Pistols, the New York Dolls, the Ramones, and the Buzzcocks. I cut my hair and gave away some of my old records. I even threw out my copy of Jethro Tull's A Passion Play—which, now that I think about it, wasn't that bad an idea.

Then I woke up and remembered: I'd left the baby in the bathwater.

Fri, 04/03/2015
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The Fifth Element #90 Page 2

Fri, 04/03/2015
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Bansaku's picture

Back in the day audiophiles used to throw up carpet or curtains on the wall behind the speakers. Cheap, sometimes ugly, but effective. :P

Just the facts's picture

Imagine the purity when you eliminate all effects and save money by just taking your speakers outside. Only pesky ground reflections. Sitting atop a tall pole and pointing your speakers up solves that.

Pages

The Fifth Element #90

As a film title, Quantizing Hanson Hsu might not rank up there with Kissing Jessica Stein, but we work with what we have to work with. Hanson Hsu is the principal designer at Delta H Design, Inc., an acoustics and architecture firm based in Marina del Rey, California. Though he dabbles in some weird science, Hsu doesn't wear a white lab coat, literal or figurative. He's down-to-earth and personable, with a conversational style that evinces warm wit and a real love of music. At one point in our conversations, he exclaimed, "I get so much joy when things sound good."
Fri, 04/03/2015
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The Audio Centennial (+1) Revolution Pulse Code Modulation

Thu, 04/02/2015
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Music_Guy's picture

Right on the mark with this one!

dalethorn's picture

37 years later, in the electronics business, and a good deal of what Holt envisioned hasn't been fully realized. Worst of all is the fact that the big record companies are taking advantage of the new technologies to make the recordings more commercial, and usually worse. But there are some good things - the elimination of the nth generation master for example, since bit-perfect copies can be made. This quote: "but it is more than likely that it will introduce a completely new set of as-yet-unimagined imperfections of its own" was true then, and we continue to discover new things. How long ago in that 37 years did we have jitter 100 percent fixed? 10 years ago? I don't think so.

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The Audio Centennial (+1) Revolution

Despite the myriads of technological breakthroughs announced month after month with tedious regularity by manufacturers of pickups, amplifiers and loudspeakers, there are only five developments in the 101-year history of audio reproduction (footnote 1) that we would call truly revolutionary. We will doubtless offend many by stating that Edison's phonograph was not one of them. It was the starting point, it was not a turning point. Emile Berliner's disc was revolutionary, in that it changed the whole format of sound reproduction, and made possible true mass production of recordings (footnote 2).
Sun, 10/01/1978
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Recording of August 1982: Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No.6

Prokofiev: Piano Sonata No.6 Op.82
James Boyk, piano
Performance Recordings PR-3 (LP). James Boyk, prod., Michael Fraser, eng., Doug Sax, mastering eng.

James Boyk has become something of a phenomenon. Not only is he a Professor of Music (at Cal Tech) who teaches how to listen to reproduced sound and writes articles about sound reproduction (for New West magazine), he is also a virtuosic pianist who produces perfectionist-caliber recordings of his own recitals. This recording, Mr. Boyk's third LP (footnote 1), is of one of Prokofiev's later works, and is a magnificent piano recording. Much credit must be given to both Mr. Boyk and his recording engineer, Michael Fraser. The instrument seems to be right in front of one, with as accurate a sound as any piano reproduction I have heard. It is interesting to note that the recording was made with ribbon mikes (the legendary Coles 4038s, perhaps?) and all-tube electronics "from mike to grooves."

Sun, 08/01/1982
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