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Jana Dagdagan Posted: Oct 12, 2016 13 comments
The first seminar of the day—and the show—was Affordability: How Low Can You Go?
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Herb Reichert Posted: Oct 11, 2016 2 comments
My brain began to spin, wondering how the thing actually works. What keeps the record on the platter? What keeps the tonearm on the record?
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Jason Victor Serinus Posted: Oct 11, 2016 23 comments
On Friday morning at 9am, the blogging team of (left to right) yours truly, John Atkinson, Herb Reichert, and Jana Dagdagan gathered for a strategy meeting…
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Oct 11, 2016 0 comments
Thursday, October 13, 6–8pm, Blink High End (129 Franklin Street, Cambridge, MA)02139) is presenting an evening with Raidho, Aavik,and Ansuz and from 5:30–8pm: Trutone Electronics (980 Dundas Street East, Mississauga, Ontario) will host a computer audio seminar hosted by AudioQuest, featuring how to successfully use a computer as a high-performance media source.
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Jana Dagdagan Posted: Oct 08, 2016 18 comments
Somehow, the conversation started to lean toward the topic of whiskey…
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Herb Reichert Posted: Oct 07, 2016 7 comments
I flew to Denver in a tin can…
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Jason Victor Serinus Posted: Oct 07, 2016 16 comments
Not having listened to Tchaikovsky's Symphony No.6, aka the "Pathétique," in quite some time, I had forgotten how heart-tugging beautiful it is. While there are many recordings of the work, few can possibly sound as good and feel as right as the new hybrid SACD from Channel Classics with Iván Fischer conducting the Budapest Festival Orchestra. Due out October 7, when it will also be available for download in high-resolution format from, the recording also enlists the fine Brno Czech Philharmonic Choir for its atmospheric pairing, Borodin's Polovtsian Dances.
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Herb Reichert Posted: Oct 06, 2016 3 comments
When you get old and gray and all them shoot-'em-up dudes doe wanna ride wit you no mo, don't fret—you can still have fun. Once you're a geezer, you'll have more time to work in the garden, drink tea, buy LPs, and fiddle with your unipivot.

When I was José Cuervo young, I mocked belt-drive turntables, unipivot tonearms, and teetotalers. "You can't drink, dance, shoot up the bar, and play hot records wit no persnickety belt-drive or wobbly unipivot. You need a masculine, pro-fessional-quality direct-drive or rim-drive turntable with a sturdy a gimbal-bearing tonearm!"

J. Gordon Holt Posted: Oct 06, 2016 Published: Jul 01, 1968 4 comments
The Swiss-made G-36 recorder had earned an enviable reputation among perfectionists during the few years that it has been available in the US, and our inability to test one (because of a backlog of other components for testing) became increasingly frustrating to us with each glowing report we heard from subscribers who owned them. Now that we have finally obtained one through the courtesy of ELPA (footnote 1), we can see what all the shouting was about, but we also have some reservations about it.
Jon Iverson Posted: Oct 04, 2016 12 comments
"They're so damn hard to tell apart!"

So exclaimed my longtime pal and fellow audiophile Bruce Rowley when I revealed to him that T+A Elektroakustik's new DAC 8 DSD digital-to-analog converter ($3995) had arrived for review, just after I'd finished writing up the Ayre Acoustics Codex DAC–headphone amp ($1795). Bruce had recently compared his own brand-new Codex with a DAC he'd owned for a couple years, both costing about the same but built to very different designs. He was surprised that, after carefully matching levels and working to eliminate any other variables, they sounded more alike than not, and only slightly different even after hours of listening. Technically, these were two very different animals.