LATEST ADDITIONS

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John Atkinson Posted: Jul 10, 2004 Published: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments
I recently came across a 1998 report, "Explaining the Computer Productivity Paradox," by Kevin Stiroh and Robert H. McGuckin III, that discussed the apparent fact that the widespread use of computers has not resulted in any significant increase in worker productivity. This is indeed a paradox, as my experience in the magazine business has left me with the opposite impression. We all do more, with less, than at any earlier time.
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Art Dudley Posted: Jul 10, 2004 Published: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments
All the world, even you
Should learn to love the way I do
—Bryan Ferry, "Take a Chance with Me"
Michael Fremer Posted: Jul 10, 2004 Published: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments
Leaving aside for a moment the fact that the Wavac SH-833 costs $350,000/pair—
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 05, 2004 0 comments
XM on a roll: Recent marketing efforts appear to be paying off for XM Satellite Radio. On July 2, the satellite radio startup announced that it had exceeded the 2.1-million subscriber mark during the second quarter. More than 418,000 new subscribers signed up during that period—over twice the number recruited in the same quarter last year. XM-compatible products are appearing at an ever-increasing number of retail outlets, leading some observers to believe that the company may have a fighting chance in the long run.
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Barry Willis Posted: Jul 05, 2004 0 comments
Audiophiles of every stripe know that achieving a realistic soundstage is maddeningly elusive—some would say impossible. When a system is right for some recordings, it's far off for others.
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 05, 2004 0 comments
Would a piece of Krell electronics be the crowning jewel on your equipment rack?
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Jon Iverson Posted: Jul 05, 2004 0 comments
Most audiophiles are generally loathe to think that they'd run their main audio systems from a computer. Last time we ran a poll, answers such as this one from David L. Wyatt, Jr. were typical: "Why in the world would I hook my computers to my stereo? If I want to make a compilation CD of the music I have purchased, I'll just burn one."
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Stereophile Staff Posted: Jul 05, 2004 0 comments
We begin with a January 1993 article from Robert Harley called The Jitter Game. RH explains, "Clock jitter is a serious and underestimated source of sonic degradation in digital audio. Only recently has jitter begun to get the attention it deserves, both by high-end designers and audio academics."
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John Atkinson Posted: Jul 04, 2004 Published: Feb 01, 1997 0 comments
When I first started buying records at the end of the 1950s, I had this vision of the typical recording engineer: A sound wizard wearing a white lab coat rather than a cloak festooned with Zodiacal symbols. He (it was always a "he," of course) would spare no effort, no expense to create a disc (LPs and 45s were all we had) that offered the highest possible sound quality. At that time I also believed that Elvis going into the Army meant the end of rock'n'roll, that my teachers knew everything, that politicians were honest, that socialism was the best form of government, and that talent and hard work were all you needed to be a success. Those ideas crashed and burned as I grew up, of course, but other than the long-discarded white coats, each new record I bought strengthened rather than weakened my image of the recording engineer.
John Atkinson Posted: Jul 04, 2004 Published: Dec 01, 1990 0 comments
"Desperation is the Mother of Invention." Isn't that how the proverb goes? Certainly it applied ten years ago in the case of the Philips engineers working on the development of the Compact Disc system. Given a specification that had included a 14-bit data word length, they had duly developed a 14-bit DAC chip, the TDA1540, only then to be informed that the CD standard decided upon after Sony joined forces with the Dutch company would involve 16-bit data words. (Thank goodness!)

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