LATEST ADDITIONS

Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Sep 27, 2004 0 comments
Old-school two-channel hi-fi may be in the doldrums—a phenomenon of concern only to those manufacturers still solely mining that niche. Those who have caught the home-theater wave are working overtime developing and producing great-sounding new equipment for use with surround-sound systems, flat-panel televisions, and custom installation, according to reports from the CEDIA Expo held earlier this month in Indianapolis.
Filed under
Jon Iverson Posted: Sep 27, 2004 0 comments
Audiophiles have had little reason to follow the high-definition video DVD format conflict. Until now.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Sep 27, 2004 0 comments
Media servers are one of the hottest trends in home entertainment, as mentioned by Jon Iverson last week.
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Sep 27, 2004 0 comments
From the September 2004 issue, Larry Greenhill sets up the James Loudspeaker EMB-1200 subwoofer, remarking, "Powerful deep-bass response means more than just pure tones. Rather, it requires raw power, tactile surges of air pressure, and a mix of the senses of hearing and touch." LG reports on whether or not the EMB-1200 meets those standards.
Filed under
Barry Willis Posted: Sep 27, 2004 0 comments
Apple vs Apple: Despite persistent rumors of an impending settlement, the trademark dispute between Apple Corps, the Beatles' record company, and Apple Computer remained unresolved as of late September. The rift arose from the computer company's entry into the music business with its iTunes Music Store, in apparent violation of a previous deal in which it agreed not to do so. One possible outcome of current discussions between the two companies could be the first-ever online availability of Beatles recordings, an exclusive arrangement that might give iTunes an advantage over its competitors.
John Marks Posted: Sep 21, 2004 Published: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments
Flowers in the Dustbin: The Rise of Rock and Roll, 1947-1977
by James Miller
New York: Fireside/Simon & Schuster, 1999. Paperback, 8.5" by 5.5", 416 pp. $15.00. ISBN 0-6848-6560-2.
Filed under
Jonathan Scull Posted: Sep 21, 2004 Published: Oct 01, 1998 0 comments
Kathleen (K-10) and I first met Jack Renner—Telarc's Chairman, CEO, and Chief Recording Engineer—at Iridium, a tony jazz club here in New York. He was recording Benny Golson and the Jazz Messengers doing a rousing a tribute to Art Blakey. Now what would you think a guy who's won 31 Grammys over 21 years would be doing, exactly? Maybe feet up, a cigar languidly tracing curlicues in the air while directing his minions?
Filed under
Kalman Rubinson Posted: Sep 21, 2004 Published: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments
My experience at last May's Home Entertainment 2004 East confirmed that even a big cheerleader for discrete, high-resolution multichannel music must be realistic about the vast heritage of two-channel recordings, which will dominate collections for years to come. Although we can enjoy these recordings with a good stereo system, a multichannel system can offer options that give them new life without superimposing false and disturbing directional effects or smearing the two channels around and behind the listener.
Filed under
Larry Greenhill Posted: Sep 21, 2004 Published: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments
Harry Partch (1901-1974), composer and inventor of musical instruments, delighted in generating deep bass. Finding most standard orchestral instruments wanting in that department, he built the huge Marimba Eroica, which he described on his A Glimpse into the World of Harry Partch: 27 Unique Instruments (LP, Columbia MS-20576):
Filed under
Stereophile Staff Posted: Sep 20, 2004 0 comments
From the September 2004 issue, Art Dudley gets his mitts on the Spendor S5e loudspeaker, remarking, "I'm never more conservative than when the subject turns to home audio . . . . Give me thin-walled hardwood cabinets, obsolete tweeters, and handmade polypropylene woofers . . . ."

Pages

X