LATEST ADDITIONS

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Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 07, 2005 4 comments
Chris Sommovigo from Signals Super-Fi passed this one my way. A great read.
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Jon Iverson Posted: Nov 07, 2005 0 comments
Rarely does a day pass when Wes Phillips doesn't send his pals a bunch of emails with links to stuff he's found while Web surfing. Frequently it is audio-related, but even when it's not, there's usually something there worth checking out.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 07, 2005 0 comments
Hey, it's only streamed audio, but Public Radio Fan is easy to navigate and offers lots of variety.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 07, 2005 0 comments
Other than making you look like a dork, that is.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
On November 1, Window OS expert Mark Russinovich revealed that his root kit detection utility had uncovered the presence of some well-hidden, poorly written code that was clogging computer resources and could potentially crash his computer or, if removed, disable his CD drive.
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Wes Phillips Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
The hits just keep on coming in fair-use land. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has proposed legislation that requires that all digital radio content be encrypted, including works that now exist in the public domain. The proposed legislation would apply to satellite radio (Sirius, XM) as well as conventional terrestrial broadcasting. As proposed by the RIAA, content could be recorded only in blocks of 30 minutes or longer, and the recorded data could not be exported from the recording device (in other words, you could only play it back on the device you had recorded it on—no more recording programs on your hi-fi to listen to on your way to work). To learn more about this legislation, go to Public Knowledge's two-page summary. While you're there, you might want to check out "Why These Issues Matter."
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John Atkinson Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
The 2006 edition of the Stereophile Buyer's Guide is out now. Listing the specifications of more than 5000 audio components within its 212 large-format pages, the Buyer's Guide is exclusively concerned with products for music reproduction, as opposed to the bangs, bonks, and battle noises typical of movie soundtracks.
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Jason Victor Serinus Posted: Nov 06, 2005 0 comments
Film Music Radio (FMR), one of the newest outposts in the expanding galaxy of cyberspace music media, emerged from the digital ethers on September 13. The Internet radio station streams film and television soundtracks around the clock, and offers genre-based block programs and unique DJ-hosted specialty shows.
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Michael Fremer Posted: Nov 06, 2005 Published: Jan 06, 1999 0 comments
If compact discs are so damned dynamic and vinyl is so dynamically limited, why do they sound just the opposite? Why do LPs sound so "live," so explosive, so "there," and CDs so dead? Even the best CDs usually sink to second-rate when you switch to their vinyl versions. I've heard it, you've heard it. Only those in deep denial, those who refuse to listen, don't. They'd rather read the published specs and consider the actual listening some kind of mass delusion among Luddite LP fans.
Jack English Posted: Nov 06, 2005 Published: Sep 06, 1996 0 comments
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder—but all too often there is little of beauty to be found in high-end audio. In these aesthetic dark ages, we have been indoctrinated to forsake grace and elegance; we all know that every underlying penny should be spent only in the pursuit of superior sonic performance.

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