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jdmccall56
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Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: Apr 5 2011 - 11:31am
random noise: crumby sounding recordings

I've read of the "golden age" for audio recordings (probably the late 50's through the mid sixties, more or less?).  So when are these current "dark ages" of audio going to (mercifully) end?  It seems to me the overwhelming majority of popular music recordings sound just awful these days.  It's gotten to the point that I am reluctant to spend any amount on same, because by now I pretty much assume the sound will be poor, with no air or sense of space or three dimensionality, and no sparkle and certainly no dynamics. 

I know this is a topic of interest in the audiophile community, but what about in the pro audio world?  Is there any sense there that a problem even exists?  Do they think no one cares about sound quality anymore.  Apparently, not many do.

And exactly who is responsible?  To whose front gate do we march, torches and pitchforks in hand? 

And assuming we even knew who was responsible, what would be their motive for fouling so much our sonic elixer?  Is it monetary?  Or perhaps it's just incompetance or complacence.

It seems more than a little interesting to me that as the quality of the product has plummeted, sales of music recordings have plummeted right along with it.  Cause and effect? 

At least most new classical and jazz recordings still sound wonderful.  Those communities seem to be comprised of artists, producers and engineers who still care about sound quality, thank goodness! Of course, they can't seem to "move product" either...another topic for another day.

     

WillWeber
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Last seen: 10 months 1 week ago
Joined: Nov 11 2010 - 7:54am
One word: COMPRESSION

It's the "loudness wars" in pop, i.e. he who uses the top of the dynamic range the most wins, loudness is all the counts to get the attention of the listener.

Who's at fault? Maybe the listener for buying this crap; it's about the money, uh sales. Producers compete in this uninformed market environment.

So, buy jazz and classical, let pop die in its swamp of harshness.

Who loses? The artists, unfortunately.

jdmccall56
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Last seen: 1 year 10 months ago
Joined: Apr 5 2011 - 11:31am
Yes, I definitely agree that

Yes, I definitely agree that the over-use of dynamic compression is a big factor.  Not that any and all compression in pop music is a bad thing.  It's kind of like salt.  A little can really improve the flavor.  But too much and the food is only fit for throwing out. 

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