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hcsunshine
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Joined: Nov 13 2011 - 4:06pm
not analog vs. digital... analog AND digital...

i heard somewhere that the information on a vinyl record actually goes a lot higher than 20khz. so the information that you can hear sounds that much better. in a conversation in this forum, someone stated that the vinyl sound was kind of "rounded off". now, nothing goes from 20hz-20khz like a cd, but we both noticed that cd's kind of have all the same volume. and he couldn't explain why cd's sound like that (i don't know either). somebody else noted here that on a system up to $5,000, vinyl and cd's will sound about the same. on a system costing more than that however, vinyl will sound better. i myself like the sound of vinyl. tho when i listen at high volumes or want to listen to a lot of bass i play cd's. bottom line: i think vinyl is more acurate and natural reproduction of the music, from what information is there (even if vinyl doesn't go 20-20). 

JoeE SP9
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Frequency response.

Where did you get the idea that vinyl doesn't do 20Hz to 20KHz? CDs are restricted to only go from 20Hz to 20KHz. It's possible for vinyl to have response from below 20Hz to beyond 40KHz. In practice that wide a range is rarely used but it's available if the engineer and producers want to use it.

Do a search on the CD-4 type LP.

absolutepitch
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beyond 20 kHz

JoeE has got it right, again. When quadraphonic was introduced in the '70s, one system was the four-channel LP recorded at frequencies up to 40 kHz and maybe beyond that a bit if I recall correctly. The recording system had to cut records at those high frequencies, which meant that cutter head had to be able to respond to the accelerations.

The other end if the line is the cartridge and stylus has to trace the grooves with those high frequencies cut into it. Each cycle of a 40 kHz is very small, on the order of 5 microns of length on the LP, at the inner grooves. Then the cartridge frequency response has to be higher than 40 kHz to reproduce the waveform. That was a real challenge then.

JoeE SP9
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CD-4

JVC invented and introduced the Shibata stylus and a special vinyl compound specifically for CD-4 LPs. Every subsequent and current "exotic" stylus shape owes it's existence to the Shibata stylus.

hcsunshine
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good to know...makes me like vinyl that much more..

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