How much time do you spend each week sitting in your audio system's sweet spot listening to music?

How much time do you spend each week sitting in your audio system's sweet spot listening to music?
0-5 hours
32% (88 votes)
5-10 hours
30% (83 votes)
10-15 hours
21% (58 votes)
15-20 hours
8% (23 votes)
20-30 hours
5% (14 votes)
30-40 hours
2% (6 votes)
More than 40 hours
1% (4 votes)
Total votes: 276

Reader Samo Jecnik, from Ljubljana, Slovenia, has a simple question for audiophiles: "I'd like to know how much time per week <I>Stereophile</I> readers <I>listen</I> to the music on their <I>main</I> systems. I mean the time they're sitting in the sweet spot."

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COMMENTS
Tony Coughlin's picture

Ah, the joys of retirement expressed in long hours of musical nirvana. it's better than . . . well, it's very good.

Vincent Spena's picture

I wish I could do it more. I listen to lots of music and the sweet spot gives a more enjoyable experience. However my schedule does not allow for more.

Todd R's picture

10-15 seems about right, but it's not nearly enough. Maybe I'll get my dedicated listening room someday.

Jose Garcia's picture

One thing is sitting in the sweet spot when you have the time to concentrate on it and other the time we actualy invest listening to music.I can't work or drive my car without music.Just listen to it and you would be happier.

Glynn Wilson's picture

Sometimes I feel I spend more time reading about it than listening.

Bob L's picture

My favorite form of entertainment and relaxation is to sit exactly in the sweet spot of my system and become intoxicated with the power and the majesty of my B&W Nautilus 802s powered by my new NAD Silver Series components. Ain't nothin' better than 8 to 15 hours per week of pure pleasure.

Scott's picture

The time may vary depending upon my mood and desire for critical listening. If I spend much more than that, I tend to overdose and not fully enjoy all that my system and the music has to offer. Most nights of the week, I go to the room and partake in "concert time". Earlier in the day I will plan my evenings concert. 1.5 - 2 hours of listening is good for an evening...unless it's the weekend...then it's most likely longer!

J.  Teoh's picture

Would love to spend more hours in between the Extremas, but gotta get a life as well. For some reason, in the tropics here, the sound of my system always sounds better after a rain.

Andrew Johnson's picture

Depends on if the new CD I get is of audiophile quality. If it's not, I want to get out of the sweet spot much quicker. Especially when those on-axis highs blare on bad recordings . . .

Greg Carlin's picture

Ahhhh . . .

;'s picture

;

Joao Camilo's picture

About 45 minutes a day

Karl R., U.T.  Film Dept., Austin's picture

Maybe just 2 hours a week in the sweet spot, Sunday morning mostly. The rest of the time, on any given day we are running around the house with up to 3 stereos (2 are tubed) playing NPR news in the evening while we cook, etc.

Ned Rasmussen's picture

It should be more, but does not allow.

Michael Crespo's picture

It depends on how busy I am, but I usually can't listen more than 10 hours a week. Being a doctoral student who also works 30 hours a week, I don't have too much free time.

Rob's picture

I actually got rid of my TV when I bought my C-J CAV 50 and Rega Planet. I can't say I've missed it. I'm either listening, reading, or both.

Thom Taylor's picture

My wife travels on business. When she's gone, there's nothing but music in my world.

Lynn Bettinger's picture

Wish it were more. Secret fantasy: 15-20 hours.

KJ's picture

Meaning of life?

Dexter M.  Price's picture

I reported the "0-5 hours" choice. Certainly not as many listening hours as I would like. However, I choose the "quality" of the listening experience over the "quantity" of the listening experience.

Federico Cribiore's picture

Sadly. I wish I could listen more, but it so often seems like if I get one solid day a week, I am lucky.

M.  Borders's picture

After spending 12 years building and upgrading my audio system, I would feel slighted if I didn't spend at least 2-3 hours per day listening solely to music. Having a stressful job, I spend many hours in front of my $20,000-plus system just letting the music relax my tired brain and put me in a good mood! Will you marry me, Diana Krall??

Cleo R.'s picture

Unfortunately, not as much as I expected when I was putting the system together. Why is that? My system is in the basement, where the little ones can't put their sticky hands on it. I spend more time upstairs living with my second system, which cost 1/10th as much as my main system. Eventually something's gotta change.

Mats Neander, Sweden's picture

Under 5 hours a week? And I consider myself an audiophile? Yes, I definitely prefer a few "quality" hours of listening to having the radio or CD player just putting out noises in the background all day (or evening) long. That kind of listening could, of course, have its virtues too. I spend a lot of time working; just a few hours are left to really enjoy music—in the "sweet spot" that is. And how sweet are those dear sounds of favorite music making their way out through the cones & domes of the boxes in front of me, in the comfort of my own living room!

Peter MacHare's picture

I figure about 11 hours a week. Wish it were more. Now when I retire . . .

David L.  Wyatt, Jr.'s picture

I'm too bloody busy!

Skip Pettit's picture

My answer is somewhat seasonal. Right now I've got too many things to do outdoors before Old Man Winter hits, but once he does, I get to spend more time listening, especially on the weekends.

Mike Mitchell's picture

My sweet spot is my car. I have a Theta Basic IIIA DAC, Dynaudio speakers, and 1000W of Soundstream amps. Wes Phillips inspired me to use DACs in the car. It is the only way to go!!!

K.  Doctor's picture

One wife, one 10-year-old daughter, in NYC . . . I'm lucky if I get 6 hours in.

Randy Lert's picture

Wish it could be more - but even that requires making it a priority in life and setting aside time for listening.

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