Halide Design S/PDIF Bridge USB-S/PDIF converter Specifications

Sidebar 1: Specifications

Description: Bus-powered USB-S/PDIF converter for use with PCs and Macs (no third-party driver software required). Input: USB 1.1–compliant. Operates in asynchronous isochronous mode. Output: S/PDIF electrical on 75 ohm BNC plug or Eichmann Silver Bullet RCA plug, as requested by customer. Sample rates supported: 44.1, 48, 88.2, 96kHz. Input/output bit depth: 16 or 24. Includes 6' USB cable.
Dimensions: 0.5" (13mm) diameter by 3.5" (89mm) L, plus integral 6' cable. Weight: approximately 2oz (56gm).
Finish: Black-anodized aluminum.
Serial Numbers Of Units Reviewed: 2100099 (BNC), 2100104 (RCA).
Price: $450. Approximate number of dealers: 12 (and sold direct).
Manufacturer: Halide Design/Devilsound Labs. Tel: (858) 224-3551. Web: www.halidedesign.com.

COMPANY INFO
Halide Design/Devilsound Labs
(858) 224-3551
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rashumon's picture

Hi There,
You mentioned in your review that only a few DACs use USB asynchronous mode and mentioned those that you thought did. but you forgot to mention the HRT MS product which also works in asynch USB mode and at a price very similar to the Halide design reviewed here.

It was reviewed by Stereophile in Nov 2009 with positive results...

Would be good to see your opinion of how these compare to each other...

stereodudeiii's picture

Suppose your USB port is 2.0 instead of the older 1.1 - makes any difference (I understand that from a purely computer perspective, USB 2.0 is [supposedly] backwards-compatible with 1.1 - the question is from an audiophile perspective)?

John Atkinson's picture
"the HRT MS product which also works in asynch USB mode and at a price very similar to the Halide design reviewed here. It was reviewed by Stereophile in Nov 2009 with positive results..."

The first-generation HRT Music Streamers did not operate in asynchronous mode. The Mk.II versions do, but were not available when I wrote this Halide review.

"Suppose your USB port is 2.0 instead of the older 1.1 - makes any difference?"

No. As you wrote, USB2.0 is indeed backward compatible with 1.1. But the common USB-serial audio chips available are based on USB1.1.

John Atkinson
Editor, Stereophile

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