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jmanderson7
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Joined: Dec 12 2005 - 6:35am
Fixing a Denon DP 3000

Good Day All.

I don't know if there is a cure for my problem, but I'll ask anyway. I have a Denon DP 3000 that is no longer working. I'm assuming it is late '70s/early '80's so it was bound to break down sooner or later. Anyway, the problem is that even thought the platter still spins, it only spins at one speed.....fast. Not 33 1/3, not 78, but as fast as it wants. It has push buttons for speeds, but like I said, it only spins full-out. Is there any way to fix this? Is it even worth trying? I have since moved upward and onward as far as turntables go, but if I could get if fixed I would pass it on to my 12 year old nephew who loves music (and playing the bass). Any hobby that keeps him off the streets.....
Anyway, just hoping one of you fine members may have a lot more experience and answers than I do. It is a direct-drive 'table, that up until the whole spinning out of control issue, worked just fine.
Also, it has a MAS (Music and Sound out of Philedelphia I think) tonearm that I' wondering about. Anyone ever hear of them? I haven't been able to find any reviews or information other than the name of the company on the tonearm box.
Any little bit of information will be greatly appreciated. And remember, a 12 year old possible audiophile prospects future is on the line here!

Thanks,

john a.

Jan Vigne
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Joined: Mar 18 2006 - 12:57pm
Re: Fixing a Denon DP 3000

You can get the table serviced. You'll more than likely have to send it off to a shop that does vintage audio repair as not many shops want to get tied down to an older product for fear it might turn into a nightmare. The speed sensing network has probably got a few bad caps. The total repair is probably going to be between $125-175, including shipping. If you think the table is worth that amount vs. just finding a different table, put "vintage audio repair" in a search engine to begin looking for someone who might take a look at the table. If you totally wash out, let me know and I'll see if I can still find my friend who used to do repairs.

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