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ceulrich
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Converting vinyl to CD

Hello All,

I have finally decided to sell off my record collection, but before I do that I want to make CD copies of some of my favorites. Toward that end I obtained an Griffin iMic USB ADC/DAC device and a copy of the VinylStudio software. I am running OS 10.4.11 on a G4 Power PC Mac. Before I started to make actual transfers, I decided to practice on a old (1960 vintage) stereo check out record. This one had 1KHz test tones and a series of spot frequencies from 30 Hz to 10 KHz, plus some music tracks. So I made the transfer via a wav file with everything (VinylStudio and Midi setup) set for 44.1 KHz at 16 bits. When I played the CD I noticed a faint, but still very noticeable, ticking sound, estimated at about 3-5 per second, on all test tones at or above 1 KHz, but not on the lower tones. When I played the wav file back through iTunes or QuickTime, I also heard the ticking sound. The music tracts sounded quite good.

Can anyone offer any advice on what direction I should go to resolve the ticking sound?

Thanks

Chuck Ulrich

Elk
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Do you get the same sound recording but without actually playing an LP?

If so, it is in the recording chain itself. If not, check the turntable, stylus, etc.

ceulrich
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Hello Elk,

The record I used has a 60 second tract of unmodulated grooves, and there is no ticking sound while playing this tract, so I assume the problem lies somewhere in the digital domain.

Thanks,

Chuck Ulrich

Drtrey3
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Digital oversaturation can sound like tics. I hope you try making a 24/96 rip and listen to it in comparison to a cd quality rip. The differences can be important.

Trey

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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

I think when converting vinyl to cd, a really key component is the phono preamp with the tape loop. I have a preamp that is indispensable for the task of conversion. I've used other preamps in the conversion process and they sound goodish but with this particular preamp amplifying and managing the signal its like night and day. So much more life, naturalness/organic-ness, air; so much more of everything in fact and a much better organized sound. So if your going to convert a lot of your LPs and if you don't have a good phono preamp for the tape loop then you might want to consider borrowing one from a friend for a few days for an extended conversion session. It will make all the difference to the end result in my experience.

ceulrich
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Hello Trey,

If I understand correctly, you suggest making a copy of the vinyl recording using an ADC running at 24 bits, with a 96KHz sampling rate. If I could find a relatively inexpensive ADC that would interface with my computer I would love to make all my copies using such a device, but so far I have not found one. Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Chuck Ulrich

ceulrich
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Hello O

Drtrey3
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Chuck, I got an Maudio card named the 2496 audiophile. It was $100 for my pc. JA has forgotten more about sound cards than I know, but I do know the card makes beautiful 24/96 recordings of my vinyl. They do not quite sound as good as vinyl, but this way my family can enjoy the tunes. They are afraid of turntables!

Trey

Elk
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

The M-Audio card is great for the money. Excellent suggestion.

ceulrich
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Hello Trey,

Thanks for the suggestion. I think my next step should be to try an upgraded USB ADC/DAC interface and the M-Audio Transit seems ideal. The price is affordable enough to allow for some experimentation. I will come back and let every one know how it works out.

Cheers,

Chuck Ulrich

ceulrich
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

Hello All,

Well, I finally sorted out my

Freako
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

I have tried to convert some of my vinyl also, but mostly for the fun of it. I use Audacity to record the vinyl tracks as .flac files. This way I can actually store the tracks as 16/44 or 24/96 whatever I chose, not that there's necessarily an audible advantage in chosing the latter format.

Some of the older lp's with lots of scratches can be saved as "listenable" files this way, if there's a "declick" or other option available to take away the worst clicks and pops. A high filter can do good also.

Good luck

Jim Tavegia
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Re: Converting vinyl to CD

I use an FCA 202 in my desk top rig, and for the money it is a very nice piece. I am surprised that Behringer has dropped the product. The price may have been too low for people to take it seriously.

I use Sony Sound Forge Audio Studio build 9.0 d for all my recording in my laptop with an 2496 Echo Indigo IO card and with the FCA 202 in my desktop. When not location recording I use a Mackie 802 VLZ3 for level adjustments from my sources.

There is a vinyl restoration program in Sound Forge I have tried, but find no advantge to using it. There is another "process" setting for cleaning up very noisey discs, but I do not use it that much either.

I run full sides of lps and then break them up into tracks by cutting and pasting. I am only doing 2496 needledrops when I do them. I am not digitizing my lp collection as with 3 tts I can listen when ever I want. Once in a while I might do one, but 2496 is the way to go.

If you add the $40 Audio DVD Creator program you can burn those 2496 pcm files onto a DVD+r for playback in any DVD player. It supports NTSC (USA) and the European standard PAL as well. That is where the funs starts for me. I hear a difference with needledrops at 16 bit. 2496 is it for me.

The lastest version of Sony Sound Forge Audio Studio build 10 goes to 24/192. All for under $100. Very nice program.

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