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fightclub
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is Cary 300SEI good for ProAc response one SC

I have the ProAc one SC and want to get a new tube amp. I saw stereophile article to use Cary 300SEI, so i want to have more advice about this Cary 300SEI before buying it.

Many thanks,
J

commsysman
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Cary 300SEI

The Cary 300SEI is rated to put out a maximum power of 11 watts per channel.

For an average sized room, this would mean that to use it effectively you would need loudspeakers with an exceptionally high sensitivity to produce anything resembling normal music listening levels; at least 95db per watt.

This completely rules out the ProAc speakers, which have a very low sensitivity of 86 db per watt. They need an amplifier with a minimum of around 70-80 watts per channel IMO to perform at their best and provide a normal listening level.

Very few tube amplifiers have that kind of power, but if you have the money, Audio Research does make some excellent high-power tube amplifiers.

The Jolida JD801R amplifier is around $2000, and that might be worth considering if you definitely want a tube amplifier. It has enough power for the ProAc speakers.

I suggest that you consider the excellent Musical Fidelity M3i integrated amplifier, which can put out around 100 watts per channel and has excellent sound quality, or the Arcam A28. They may be solid-state, but their sound quality is excellent and they cost less than $2000.

Catch22
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If your room is smallish, it would work

But, as mentioned, you are not going to rock the walls with 15 watts per channel. One of my systems uses 16 watt tube amps in a 12x15' room...with 85dB monitors and I love it. It's all I need to enjoy the music. I do not listen at anywhere near 95dB levels, though. More like 85dB peaks and 75dB or less on average.

fightclub
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commsysman wrote:
commsysman wrote:

The Cary 300SEI is rated to put out a maximum power of 11 watts per channel.

For an average sized room, this would mean that to use it effectively you would need loudspeakers with an exceptionally high sensitivity to produce anything resembling normal music listening levels; at least 95db per watt.

This completely rules out the ProAc speakers, which have a very low sensitivity of 86 db per watt. They need an amplifier with a minimum of around 70-80 watts per channel IMO to perform at their best and provide a normal listening level.

Very few tube amplifiers have that kind of power, but if you have the money, Audio Research does make some excellent high-power tube amplifiers.

The Jolida JD801R amplifier is around $2000, and that might be worth considering if you definitely want a tube amplifier. It has enough power for the ProAc speakers.

I suggest that you consider the excellent Musical Fidelity M3i integrated amplifier, which can put out around 100 watts per channel and has excellent sound quality, or the Arcam A28. They may be solid-state, but their sound quality is excellent and they cost less than $2000.

Now the Cary 300SEI is 15w and in the article of Stereophile it seems Cary 300SEI is quite competent for ProAc 1sc.
Thank you anyway!

fightclub
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Catch22 wrote:
Catch22 wrote:

But, as mentioned, you are not going to rock the walls with 15 watts per channel. One of my systems uses 16 watt tube amps in a 12x15' room...with 85dB monitors and I love it. It's all I need to enjoy the music. I do not listen at anywhere near 95dB levels, though. More like 85dB peaks and 75dB or less on average.

Yes, same as me and i don't like high level of sound and just like women vocal and violin music.

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