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cfb
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Best low cost room treatment?

Anyone care to nominate the Ficus as the best low cost room treatment?

ludwigvan968
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

can you tell us a little more about it? I have never heard of it, maybe a link. Thanks...:)

cfb
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

It

ethanwiner
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

CF,

> Anyone care to nominate the Ficus as the best low cost room treatment? <

As appealing as this may be, I can't imagine a ficus plant doing much acoustically. Mostly because it doesn't have enough mass to either absorb or diffuse. Now, if you put 100 of them in a room, and they were all at least four feet tall, that might be equal to the absorption of one modestly padded sofa.

--Ethan

gonefishin
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

Great to see you here Ethan. Even though I may not post that much in the acoustical forums...I certainly do alot of reading on the subject.

To this point...I've only scratched the surface of the treatments in my room. I can'twait to dive deeper into my less than perfect room.

ok...back on topic>>>


Quote:
Best low cost room treatment?

Anything!

no matter if it's bass traps or first reflection treatments. Just get started...even if it's only one piece.

enjoy the music!
dan

ripvw
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

some things that have worked well for me:
1. bookshelves - with books of course (paperbacks for highs, hardcovers for midrange) - used on walls behind listener for some diffraction effect - might work behind speakers too, never tried it (harder to access books)
2. flokati or some other heavy wool rug in front of speakers for floor bounce
3. wall hangings - particularly wool - used on side walls and on wall behind speakers to help damp first reflections
4. venetian blinds behind listener for diffraction
5. subwoofer position behind listener - a favorite of Dr. Hsu - seems to work very well in controlling unwanted room resonances, can drop sub volume since it is nearfield - less chance of overload and distortion. works much better for me than the oft-recommended sub-in-the-corner placement

Jim Tavegia
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

What I did may not work for you, but...

I have a smaller home office that I often do recording in, mostly vocal groups and soloists, 12x12 and rather than continue the suspended ceiling from my 14x22 video/rec room. I wanted to break up the "cube". Gropups of 4 or more I put in the 14x22 room. I have cheap foam treatment in each of the opposite corners from the speaker wall and then:

1.) I measured the width of the room and exactly cut a 2/4 the near perfect width. I found 2x4 hanger brackets that I securred to each middle of the room side walls about 7 1/2 ft up the walls. Once I was sure they were straight and level I nailed them to the nearest centered vertical wall stud. The brackets are open at the top end "U" shaped so it was easy to drop the 2x4 down into the brackets.

2.) I then found some inexpensive stretch fabric and then in two widths to fit the full length of the room tacked it across each end wall from corner to corner. At the opposite end I had my wife help to pull it tight as I tacked it to the opposite end. It basically made a fabric ceiling, but when I then installed the 2x4 it made a "vaulted" ceiling appearance ( /\ )like a fabric tent roof would look, but it broke up the normal flat, hard ceiling and put in a very absorbing, angular surface that makes the room quite dead to reflections. The center is approximately 1 ft taller than the ends. I then bought some prefinished chair rail molding and covered the wall areas where I tacked the fabric to give it a totally clean looking appearance.

The entire cost was about $40 at most. With all your fabric choices you can make it look as nice as you like.

warnerwh
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

I think that the Jon Risch quick and dirty bass traps would have to be. This is nothing but a few rolls of fiberglass insulation rolls stacked upon each other in the corners of your room. They can also be covered with burlap and you can cut pieces of particle board into the diameter of the rolls and staple the burlap to them so they look like a normal bass trap. Taping them with packaging tape first helps to keep them together. You can do two corners for less than 100 dollars. This will help noticeably.

gonefishin
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

Ethan Winer acoustics page is a fantastic read. Just make sure that you follow all the links of interest. Oh, Don't forget about the Table of contest to the right of the page.

LOTS of good information...

dan

ripvw
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?


Quote:

Ethan Winer acoustics page is a fantastic read.


thanks for the link!

flatmap
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Trying to visualize this...

So with this idea, you're changing the profile of your ceiling, but you are leaving intact the 12X12 length and width? Is that right? And is the idea of the stretch fabric is that this is attenuating or diffusing high frequencies?

Buddha
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

Cool topic!

I actually have had great luck with foam wine shippers. It helps blend my hobbies, too!

Here are some pics from the last T.H.E. Show. The tweeter zones got the "bottle tops" with tapering recesses, and the woofer zones got "bottle bottoms" that were more basstrap-like.

This first image captures the ambient light levels.

This pic shows more detail. The wine things are just stacked and placed! We could hear quite a difference with and without.

By the way, those tree lights were soaked in Tice fluid...or was that us?

arnyk
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

>2.) I then found some inexpensive stretch fabric and then in two widths to fit the full length of the room tacked it across each end wall from corner to corner.

I wouldn't expect a lot of sound absorbtion out of stretch fabric.

People who are serious about absorbing sound use materials like say 4" thick Dow Corning high density (stiff) fiberglass blocks. I found a fair amount of this kind of material lurking around a number of demo rooms at HE2005 - sometimes disguised with stretch fabric.

Jim Tavegia
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Re: Trying to visualize this...

With the corner traps and the change in ceiling angles and hardness it was a good, cheap adjustment. There is a love seat and lazyBoy in the room with fabric a long with windows and blinds that change the reflectiveness of the room as well. The floor is also carpeted.

The only cheap fix I had left was to take a page out of the old TV show, Hee-Haw, and staple used egg cartons to the back wall. I'm trying to lower my cholesterol so that may be out of the question.

Uptown1
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

Starting from an empty room, it has to be a rug between the speakers and the listeners. Next would be some absorbsion at the first reflection point on the side walls. Some people like to try and get one end of the room totally "dead" and leave the other side "live" but that pretty much rules out either "cheap" or "attractive"!
-Bill

Anthony Tam
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

Nothing to add except thanks for the link:

http://www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html#bass%20traps

I need to tame some bass problems in the bedroom and $500 for a bass tube or similar acoustical treatment is beyond what I would like to spend for a secondary room. This has given me some good ideas on what to investigate for a cheaper solution.

Cheers!

k512
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

My listening space consists of one half of a large, open "great room" with a vaulted ceiling and lots of bare drywall. Although I'm just beginning to address the issue of acoustical room treatments, I'll mention that I just recently had a 5'x 8' Persian wool rug hung on a key wall within my listening space, and the sonic results have been impressive.

This rather expensive rug weighs nearly 40 lbs, and it required the considerable expertise and services of a local, fine rug dealer to be properly and securely hung from the wall, and it was hung in a manner in which you simply don't see how it seems to be "levitating" on the wall unless you look up and behind the rug. (More on this in a moment.)

It is noteworthy here that the rug hangs from the wall in a manner in which there's an approximately 3" space between the back of the rug and the wall behind it. I initially questioned why this space was necessary, and I was told that placing a wool rug directly against the wall surface would be very unwise, since doing so would create a highly attractive breeding ground for moth larvae. The 3" air-space between the rug and the wall greatly discourages moth larvae from breeding, hatching, and eating the rug. (And, the more I think about things, this 3" air-gap between the rug and the wall may also result in better damping of sound waves.)

In order to further prevent moth larvae infestations, gently vacuum both sides of the rug with a canister vacuum's carpet-head cleaning attachment placed on the end of the vacuum's cleaning wand. Do this every six months or so, and it should keep the rug in fine shape for years and years.

Now then, how did the rug expert hang this heavy rug on the wall? The key was to first have eight heavy nylon ribbons or loops sewn onto the back of the rug, near the top of the long axis of the rug. A length of 0.75" metal conduit tubing was then passed through these loops, and the rug was then hung from six heavy-weight metal brackets, each of which is fastened to the underlying wall studs with 3" metal screws.

When you look at this hanging rug, there are no visible clamps, rods, or other hardware. The rug just seems to levitate a few inches in front of the wall, like magic. Pretty slick!

ethanwiner
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

Fiberglass dust is not great for your lungs, and any good commercial panel will have a proper fabric to avoid that. But it is a myth that fiberglass is a carcinogen. See this page at the American Lung Association web site:

www.lungusa.org/site/pp.asp?c=dvLUK9O0E&b=35439

--Ethan

SanBao Ma
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?


Quote:

Ethan Winer acoustics page is a fantastic read. Just make sure that you follow all the links of interest. Oh, Don't forget about the Table of contest to the right of the page.

LOTS of good information...

dan


thanks a lot ,itis very useful

Monty
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Re: Best low cost room treatment?

The next time you stop by a Wal Mart, check out the pillow section. They have 6x8 sheets of mattress padding that is made from geometrically textured foam that is about 2 inches thick and easy to cut with scissors. About $8.00 worth of this stuff goes a long way. I use the stuff behind my listening chair which sits directly in front of a medium size window with wood blinds. The stuff fits perfectly between the glass and blinds. Diffusion and absorption that is easily placed in and taken out.

My best results in controlling room excitements were achieved with this combination and a very light, synthetic throw hanging from the blinds' valance.

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