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Buddha
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A 180 on my expectation bias.

The cover promises "Superb-sounding speakers at both ends of the price spectrum"....then mentions Vandersteen and Dynaudio.

I think to myself, "Self, what wonderful affordable thing has that Vandersteen genius done now? To what extreme of excess has Dynaudio now taken its speaker line?"

45,000 and 1,200 dollars later, my expectations have been spun right round, baby, right round!

Shows how my own bias is skewed when I hear the names Vandersteen and Dynaudio!

Both reviews are great reads. Kudos to the reviewers!

(I do admit to having started to develop some price fatigue, however. {Not sour grapes, just sort of a numbing of my enthusiasm when I see some of those prices!} No offense.)

____

If I'm going to be critical - the cover had some areas of poor contrast between the text and the imaging. I run into the same problem on Powerpoint with red and black font over an image. Very hard to make it pop. The light/dark palate of the photo image was quite similar to the shading around the red font, especially in the lower left.

KBK
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.

A bit short, maybe, in that rod/cone 'male' kinda way?

Elk
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.


Quote:
Shows how my own bias is skewed when I hear the names Vandersteen and Dynaudio!

Bias runs in all directions, doesn't it?

struts
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.


Quote:
To what extreme of excess has Dynaudio now taken its speaker line?"


Funny. I was listening to the new(ish) Dynaudio Consequence UEs down at Audio Concept earlier today. I thought they sounded really nice (to my surprise, given that they appeared to have been installed upside down) but $70,000 later I was still thinking that I like my Verity Parsifals just fine thank you.

Jim Tavegia
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.

They were both fun reads to me too. As I look to replace my hard to part with AR 58's It may be that the Dynas with a sub might just be the trick, or...maybe the PSB T-6 speakers that Dr. Kal just reviewed.

I do love my Triangle Comete 202s in my 2nd system and would not part with them. The Dyna's may make me not consider a pair of Altea's or Heliades at this time.

I am just glad that I do not have MF's problem of improving upon what he must go through every few years. It probably isn't fair to call what changes he makes as "problems". Just another veil lifted in his remarkable holographic audio world.

For sure there is some nutty priced gear, but I am constantly amazed at how much current excellent gear is still affordable, as AD says, "to anyone with a job".

Buddha
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.

That Dynaudio review really was superlative in making one want to rush out and hear the product!

Kal's review of the PSB was similar in its effect.

I'll be curious to see what you decide upon.

I still want to spend some time with those new little Sunfire ribbon speakers, too.

There is an embarrassment of riches in the realm of sub-2K speakers right now!

Dynaudio makes a line of 'studio' speakers that is quite affordable, as well.

So much product, so little time!

KBK
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.


Quote:
A bit short, maybe, in that rod/cone 'male' kinda way?

You can touch the post, fellas. It isn't a penis, or even a short one. It has to do with ability to see reds and the consideration of color blindness, and it is nearly 100% a male phenomena.. It's not about the other Rod/cone.

The safer bet when using reds in magazines might be to head toward oranges, and such, and stay away from any situation involving reds as it can be seen as brown if it is not saturated enough and separated enough. This affects, to some degree or another, 10% of males.

If you can specify the particular pigment type or specific dye in use when using reds (I doubt that, such people as printers don't go that deep into it), then it can be dealt with.

One way to defeat it is to use RGB printing instead of CMYK printing. Most printing presses these days, use CMYK, IIRC.

When yo go from RGB 0-255 in adobe, into translation to CMYK values, the signifigant bits are also at the other end from where they should be so the add-sub issue to create a red or other sum color (primary RGB colors) that would be no problem in RGB, can become a huge problem.

So to avoid that, when setting the rag up for print, de-saturate slightly and stay away from full saturation RGB, as the CMYK translation for the printing systems will get all screwy. As will any color that is near full saturation on the given R, G, or B.

So you may have a perfect set of popping colors with beautiful delineation and punch in the office and then you get the test print back ---and it is all off.

The above, is the source of the issue. Analyze the color info in a CMYK comparative, and you will see it come up. check those numerical values and trim by hand, if possible.

Tri-art has to do this when printing for color charts, etc.

Otherwise it looks like crap. With 6500 different colors/mixes with varying degrees of saturation and tone and all minor differences and subtleties have to be delineated and separated in and to perfection, on paper... believe me, I see it often.

You should send some sample images to the standard printing people..and then 'learn the system', learn how it alters and then correct at your end, for they will NEVER do it or understand it - at theirs.

That's about the only way to balance out the copy-to-print color differential issue.

Get some premium and highly varied Color charts and then send a high quality image capture to the printers, one that has been translated by adobe, first, before it goes to them.

Then see what you get. Then start the comparative and adjustment procedure.

Ideally, the returned images should be on your usual paper stock for the rag. Actually, that is the only acceptable stock for this test loop. Blacks, etc, are obviously not going to be an issue, it's the mix colors you want to pop correctly and this is the way to get there.

Forget about color test gear. Use your eyes. OK. Maybe you need to use a Mcbeth spyder or RGB analyser. I don't, I'm down to being able to, with some decent accuracy, tell you what pigments are in use a given color, just by looking at it. And I'm a joke, the guys in the factory are damn scary in their abilities regarding this stuff.

You might have to actually get one or two of these complex and varied CMYK/RGB color charts and then get them printed in the rag (if the printers and everyone else wont' do it right,as they don't care)...and see what lands on your desk in the rag itself. That would constitute a full test loop. that's what you are looking for. If you want visual candy in the rag, this is one way to get there.

More than anything, you need a slightly more glossy stock. This means thicker, OR, more fragile paper. either costs. to do it right, it costs on both fronts. Glossier, means treated, and thicker is needed, so more costs. Contrast defines color and pop, and thicker stock will do that.

rvance
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.


Quote:

Quote:
A bit short, maybe, in that rod/cone 'male' kinda way?

You can touch the post, fellas. It isn't a penis, or even a short one. It has to do with ability to see reds and the consideration of color blindness, and it is nearly 100% a male phenomena.. .

I admire your tenacity...dogged perseverance...REFUSAL TO BE IGNORED!

When no one takes the bait, you reload the hook and quote yourself!

And deliver the inevitable goods- the all-encompassing, definitive tutorial- with unflagging self-confidence.

Amazing...

shraza66
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.

"to anyone with a job".

Unfortunately Jim in the past 2 years just having a job has become quite an ask!

Jim Tavegia
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Re: A 180 on my expectation bias.

Buddah,
"So much product, so little time!"

No truer words were ever spoken. There is so much great, affordable gear out their right now that no one needs to dispair over what "they are not hearing"!

Whether it be cd players which seem to me to be taken over by a great DAC and "any player you have right now", to the explosion of turntables and carts, to amazing speakers under $1200, I just can't find anything to complain about...other than, yes, I do greatly wish the job market was better.

I also am locally witnessing very nice people losing their homes and watch their belongings being auctioned off. That is most troublesome to me. I wish there was something one man could do about it, because I certainly would.

In public school each day I face the battle of the lower performing 30% of my students trying to motivate them to care about their education, rather than their IPods, IPhones, txting their friends (you wonder where spelling went), or their "pants on the ground". When we have only 60+% of students here graduating high school, the problem is much deeper than that.

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