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Buddha
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts

Yup, Hi Fi has that effect on people. The only challenge is getting them there to listen in the first place.

I wonder if she mailed that pic to Curtis Counce?

RGibran
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts

No one would have ever believed Curtis had more bounce than THAT!

RG

Elk
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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To that end I'm still interested in whether anyone is ever aware their toes are not tapping along with the music.


It's pretty rare for me to toe tap. I started playing in orchestras at age 12. We learned early on that orchestral players do not visibly tap.

Many of us tap our toes within our shoes however when the piece gets rhythmically challenging.

Regardless, if I notice whether I am tapping my toes or not while listening to music I have lost connection with the music and it no longer matters.

Jan Vigne
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts

I think you misunderstand what is meant by "tapping" and what you're actually doing with your (or anyone else's) toes.

RGibran
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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I think you misunderstand what is meant by "tapping" and what you're actually doing with your (or anyone else's) toes.

No argument here!

John Wayne, Western Films, USA, Moral Implications, Great Southwest, Big Sky, Vistavision, and finally, TOE TAPPING! I don't know what the flip your talkin' bout!

Maybe you misunderstand my post as well?

RG

Buddha
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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No one would have ever believed Curtis had more bounce than THAT!

RG

I love that cover!

trevort
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts

Elk --

I agree! We must be from the same school of Stuffy, Conservatory Trained SERIOUS Musicians!

On a practical level, it seems possible for fine musicians to toe tap and more while playing or listening. I was astonished to see Tony Levin bouncing around in King Crimson circa 1981 while holding a rock solid beat through nigh-on impossible time changes.

(rvance -- do you have the words to his "we're the king crimson band"?)

And yet, I also believe that toe tapping is a sign of "leaking" concentration. If you're seriously listening, sound should be going in, getting fully absorbed by your consciousness, rather than frittered away by bodily distractions

Elk
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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I agree! We must be from the same school of Stuffy, Conservatory Trained SERIOUS Musicians!


I resemble this remark (including attending the Mozarteum in Salzburg).

I don't think there is anything wrong with tapping one's foot while listening, or dancing for that matter. I just don't happen to be a toe-tapper.

Moreover, I do not want to think of my feet while listening.

It can be quite amusing how some people physically interpret music. There is a musician in a chamber group with which I perform that waves his right arm around aimlessly when he is not playing. He claims this has something to do with the music, but if I see him in even my peripheral vision I get confused.

dcstep
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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...And yet, I also believe that toe tapping is a sign of "leaking" concentration. If you're seriously listening, sound should be going in, getting fully absorbed by your consciousness, rather than frittered away by bodily distractions

Interesting concept about "leaking" concentration. I think you should let your extremities do what they need to. A couple of weeks ago I sat behind a fantastic oboe player, but it seemed like he was throwing curve balls to A-Rod he was moving so much.

Some of the most incredible virtuousos I've ever heard bobbed and weaved like Ali was jabbing at them. I myself find that moving with the music helps me play in time and with feeling. Like Elk, I'm a little restrained when performing classical, but in the funk/rock/soul genre I really move a lot (for me). That music has a bunch of end-of-beat sixteenth notes that are easier to play if you "feel it" rather than intellectualize it. Body movement helps.

In big band and rock, there's no conductor so we try to "lock in" and play "in the pocket", hooking up with the hopefully steady beat of a good drummer and bass player. That's all very physical, as is music. (Hey Elk, is trumpet playing physical?? You bet, we're the hardest working guys in the band).

So IMHO, you shouldn't avoid toe tapping, just avoid making a noise as you do it.

Dave

Jan Vigne
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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So IMHO, you shouldn't avoid toe tapping, just avoid making a noise as you do it.

Not if you're being recorded. There are too many audiophiles who listen just for that; wanting to know when was the last time you had your shoes resoled.

rvance
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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(rvance -- do you have the words to his "we're the king crimson band"?)

No, I don't. Even tho' the Court of The Crimson King and 21st Century Schizoid Man were fave prog-rock staples of the early '70's I somehow missed them in concert (or was too stoned to remember). I did see ELP, Traffic, Genesis w/Peter Gabriel and Pink Floyd around that time, amongst others. So many happy trails... I think the Who's Keith Moon was my favorite rock drummer. He had that quality of unrestrained flailing and thrashing while driving home the beat. And I guess he drank a little.

Elk
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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I think the Who's Keith Moon was my favorite rock drummer. He had that quality of unrestrained flailing and thrashing while driving home the beat. And I guess he drank a little.


At times his playing is wonderfully loose, just a little ahead and behind the beat - but in a way that adds energy and feel. Very cool.

RGibran
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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Not if you're being recorded. There are too many audiophiles who listen just for that; wanting to know when was the last time you had your shoes resoled.

For a moment there I thought we had been graced with some seemingly non-existent sarcastic JV humor! I was beginning to think you may have even got laid last evening. But a couple of re-reads and I realized it was more of the same all too serious stab at those who don

Elk
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts


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Quote:
Hey Elk, is trumpet playing physical?? You bet, we're the hardest working guys in the band.


There are people who study such things (of course). Trumpet is described as physically the most demanding modern instrument. Yet, I keep thinking that others, such as a Taiko drummer, puts great physical energy into playing.

I suspect it is a definitional issue. For example, trumpet players can generate up to 150 psi internally. By all rights we should simply explode on occasion.

Speaking of Taiko, I learned from a Taiko drummer the Japanese term ma. Ma is the silence between drum hits. Ma is as important as the sound of the drum. Ma should be actively listened to and appreciated.

Silence is as important in Western music, although many musicians fail to truly appreciate this. The space between notes is critical. Classical musicians often understand this better as a lot of classical playing is subtle.

However, I think it is just important in all genres. I really appreciate the relatively few rock bands that understand this. For example, the bass guitarist that uses relatively little compression and shapes each note he plays, leaving space between some notes, no space between others engenders great respect from me.

trevort
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Re:My facts/your facts - we all got facts

"
the bass guitarist that uses relatively little compression and shapes each note he plays, leaving space between some notes, no space between others engenders great respect from me.
"

That's one of the skills Tony Levin has in abundance, even when bouncing around the room "in 21". Though his sound is usually fairly compressed.

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