Art Dudley Listening

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Art Dudley Posted: Mar 20, 2005 0 comments
Our December 2004 issue honored 56 contemporary audio products that stood out from the pack during the course of the year. Of those 56, fully nine were phonograph components (footnote 1), including one—the Linn Sondek LP12 turntable—that's been on the market for something like a hundred years.
Art Dudley Posted: Feb 13, 2005 0 comments
It's a strange sort of progress: As culture and commerce evolve, most people look for simple, easy solutions to their needs. Enthusiasts, however, go out of their way to complicate matters, often choosing products that are expensive and difficult to use. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the world of home audio, where typical consumers have embraced the notion of smallish, self-contained music systems—yet audiophiles, who are surely as crazy as bedbugs, seem bent on parsing an ever-increasing number of individually distinct products from the basic concept of a music system.
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Art Dudley Posted: Jan 30, 2005 0 comments
First Watt isn't a real company, and the F1 power amplifier isn't a real product. Consequently, this isn't a real review.
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Art Dudley Posted: Dec 26, 2004 0 comments
You dodged a bullet.
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Art Dudley Posted: Nov 29, 2004 Published: Nov 27, 2004 0 comments
When I was a boy, silent dog whistles were all the rage. They were sold mail-order from the backs of comic books, alongside whoopee cushions and sneeze powder and X-ray spex. The whistles aren't so easy to find anymore, but don't read too much into that fact. Don't read into that at all.
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Art Dudley Posted: Oct 26, 2004 Published: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments
Once upon a time there was a violin maker who had two quarrelsome sons, and their names were John and Rudolf. When the boys came of age, their father put them to work in his shop, but John and Rudolf found it difficult to get along with one another, and they quarreled even more bitterly after the old man died.
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Art Dudley Posted: Sep 09, 2004 Published: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments
"How could there be a bad song called 'Iron Man,' or 'War Pigs,' or—my cup runneth over—'Rat Salad'?"—Nick Hornby, explaining his youthful fondness for Black Sabbath
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Art Dudley Posted: Jul 10, 2004 Published: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments
All the world, even you
Should learn to love the way I do
—Bryan Ferry, "Take a Chance with Me"
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Art Dudley Posted: Jun 19, 2004 Published: Jun 01, 2004 0 comments
A grainy film is said to exist that proves the viability of a mechanical antigravity device. The inventor, a native of Syracuse, New York named Harry W. Bull (footnote 1) placed his so-called "bootstrap machine" on a bathroom scale, focused a borrowed home movie camera on the dial, powered up the machine, and watched as the numbers spun backward. This event, and the development work that led to it, were the basis for a series of articles—and a subsequent exchange of heated letters—in Popular Science magazine. The year was 1935.
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Art Dudley Posted: May 22, 2004 Published: May 01, 2004 0 comments
"As I was saying before I was interrupted..."—Jack Paar, 1918-2004
Art Dudley Posted: Apr 18, 2004 Published: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments
Consider the fate of Giordano Bruno, a 16th-century astronomer who challenged Ptolemy's notion of Earth being the center of a finite universe—and in doing so went head to head with the church of Rome. Bruno's scholarly diligence and fearlessness were rewarded not with fame, riches, or accolades from his colleagues, but with a hot-lead enema, after which he was burned at the stake. Next heretic in line, step right up, please.
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Art Dudley Posted: Mar 21, 2004 Published: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments
One of the nicest things about communicating online is the potential for immediacy. One person can offer up a statement, another can respond within seconds, and voilà: instant town hall.
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Art Dudley Posted: Feb 15, 2004 Published: Feb 01, 2004 1 comments
Five years: My brain hurts a lot.—David Bowie
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Art Dudley Posted: Feb 01, 2004 Published: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments
When some people record music, they make an effort to record the ambient sound of the hall or other performing space along with it. On the other side of the coin, some engineers work to capture only the sounds of the performers, so the recordings they make sound comparatively dry. And, of course, there are engineers who don't make an effort one way or the other, and whose work contains whatever hall sound does or does not come their way by accident.
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Art Dudley Posted: Dec 28, 2003 Published: Dec 01, 2003 0 comments
I didn't care how the stuff measured, and I wasn't terribly worried about the sound. When the single-ended triode movement crossed my attention eight or nine years ago, I simply thought: That's for me.

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